Business Communication Chapter 8 1 Your Proposal Will Not Considered Until You

Document Type
Test Prep
Book Title
Business Communication: In Person-- In Print-- Online 8th Edition
Authors
Amy Newman, Scot Ober
Chapter 8Bad-News Messages
TRUE/FALSE
1. You should always use the indirect pattern when writing a bad-news letter.
2. Although it will not change the bad news, it is essential that the language used be persuasive to get the
reader to accept the news.
3. If you write a bad-news letter instead of making a phone call, you have more control over the wording,
sequence of ideas, and pacing of your points.
4. Use a direct plan to organize your ideas when writing a bad-news message to your supervisor.
5. You should use a buffer statement when writing a message that rejects a proposal from an employee.
6. When writing a bad-news message, one of your goals is to keep the reader's goodwill.
7. Research indicates that delivering corporate bad news by email rather than in person helps ensure a
more accurate message.
8. If you don't know your reader, you should use the indirect plan rather than the direct plan to organize
your bad-news message.
9. Keep your language concise, short, objective, and to the point when sending bad news. This helps with
accuracy.
10. Use the direct plan to organize a bad-news message involving a small but significant matter.
11. Direct messages are not necessarily shorter that indirect messages.
12. The indirect plan for a bad-news message emphasizes the reasons rather than the bad news itself.
13. When sending a customer bad news, you should use the indirect pattern.
14. Consider using a buffer when writing a bad-news message to customers, subordinates, and readers you
don't know.
15. A buffer should show appreciation and be interesting so that it motivates the reader to continue
reading.
16. Bad-new messages require careful planning.
17. The first thing you must know before giving bad news is how your audience will react.
18. Discussing how the refusal or rejection benefits the reader or someone other than your organization
makes a bad-news message sound selfish.
19. The general rule of thumb is to focus on the refusal rather than on the reasons for the refusal.
20. Always tell the bad news in the first paragraph.
21. Your objective is to convey the bad news and retain the reader's goodwill.
22. In the body of a bad-news message, focus on objective reasoning for the refusal.
23. Within the text of a bad-news message, it is appropriate to use passive voice with words such as
although and however to soften the refusal and retain goodwill.
24. Show that you care about the reader by telling them how you are willing to change policy to help
them.
25. Use the word however to prepare readers for the bad news that follows in the same sentence.
26. Effective writers offer a sincere apology when communicating bad news to a reader.
27. Your closing should buffer the bad news by anticipating specific objections the reader may have and
inviting additional communication about your decision.
28. You should not refer to the bad news in the closing of a message rejecting an idea or refusing a
request.
29. Offering your customer an alternative such as 25% off a new product will help retain their goodwill.
30. Use the direct plan for messages rejecting ideas submitted by your subordinates.
31. If possible, when firing a person it is best to give bad news in person.
32. When refusing a favor, use the indirect plan to explain your reasons.
33. Put the bad news in the last paragraph when refusing a routine customer request.
34. When a colleague asks you for a small favor that you cannot grant, you should use a goodwill opening
and a buffer closing as a courtesy.
35. When refusing a favor, give the refusal in the first paragraph.
36. For busy readers use a simple "no" without adding detailed explanations in your bad-news messages.
37. The direct plan is rarely used to refuse a customer's claim for an adjustment.
38. When refusing a claim in which the customer's actions are responsible for the problem, you should use
personalized language.
39. Due to legalities, avoid using any language that might be interpreted as acknowledging responsibility
on the part of your organization.
40. An effective claim refusal uses third-person pronouns and passive voice to avoid directly accusing the
reader of misusing the product.
41. You should apologize to the customer to show you made a mistake and they are correct in their
complaint.
42. Offering an alternative as a compromise helps retain a reader's goodwill.
43. Bad-news announcements are often written in response to another message.
44. Your relationship with the readers and the effect that the bad news will have on them, help determine
whether you should use the direct or the indirect organizational plan.
45. When informing employees of a vendor change, little explanation is required.
46. It is important that you answer all potential questions in your response to prevent further unnecessary
correspondence or discussion.
47. Correspondence involving bad news such as a plant closing should buffer the problem by providing
evidence that the situation is not a top priority for management.
48. Announcing a change in organizational policy that will have a negative impact on employees' calls for
an indirect approach.
49. Sometimes you have to support decisions with which you personally disagree.
50. Use the direct approach to communicate bad news about your organization if the audience has already
heard about the situation from another source.
MULTIPLE CHOICE
51. To achieve the goals of a bad-news message, you should
a.
use general language to cushion the impact of the negative news.
b.
persuade the reader that the decision is reasonable.
c.
apologize for having to make the decision.
d.
indicate the personal reasons for the decision.
e.
choose the direct plan based on the "you" attitude.
52. Plan to put your bad-news message in writing when you need to do any of the following except
a.
control the exact wording of the message.
b.
have a permanent record of what you say to the reader.
c.
manage the order in which you present your ideas to the reader.
d.
use courtesy and show fairness in making the decision.
e.
present the negative news using more than one buffer.
53. You should use the direct approach for a bad-news message if
a.
the reader is not likely to have an emotional response.
b.
the reader sent you a persuasive letter, not a routine letter.
c.
the reader is not expecting a negative response.
d.
the negative news involves a significant matter.
e.
you do not have a close relationship with the reader.
54. When you use the direct plan for a bad-news message, you should
a.
save any mention of the justification for the closing paragraph.
b.
include a sincere apology in the first paragraph.
c.
emphasize the reasons before presenting the negative news.
d.
state the information in language as positively as possible.
e.
avoid a friendly closing so you won't seem insincere.
55. Use the indirect plan when writing about bad news to all of the following people except
a.
customers.
b.
subordinates.
c.
readers who prefer the indirect approach.
d.
readers you don't know.
e.
supervisors.
56. The purpose of a buffer is to
a.
imply the negative news instead of stating it explicitly.
b.
make it easier to change your mind later.
c.
justify your decision for the bad news.
d.
lessen the effect of negative news.
e.
state the obvious to pave the way for the bad news.
57. Which of the following is not a characteristic of an effective buffer for a bad-news message?
a.
relevant
b.
supportive
c.
neutral
d.
short
e.
controversial
58. An example of a misleading statement would be:
a.
"Your store would be a great venue for a demo product."
b.
"It is not our policy of providing a venue for music."
c.
"I like your ideas but they will not work."
d.
"That venue is too dark for our event."
59. Compared to face-to-face meetings, email does have some advantages for delivering bad news such as:
a.
It allows the sender to determine precise wording
b.
Gives the reader time to understand the message
c.
Avoids confrontation
d.
Both a and b
60. One way to justify your decision in a bad-news message is to
a.
show how your company benefits.
b.
state how your refusing the idea will benefit the reader.
c.
cite confidentiality.
d.
explain that a third party will benefit.
e.
focus on the negative news itself rather than on the reasons.
61. Which of the following would not be considered an effective buffer?
a.
agreement
b.
appreciation
c.
a compliment
d.
facts
e.
a suggestion for improvement
62. When rejecting an idea because it is not in your company's best interests,
a.
ensure that most of your message focuses on the rationale for your decision.
b.
use a direct plan and avoid any buffers.
c.
mention all reasons, both strong and weak.
d.
prevent unnecessary communication by giving no reason.
e.
refer just to "company policy" as a rationale, rather than giving specific reasons.
63. Which of the following is an example of neutral or positive language you might use to convey bad
news about rejecting an idea?
a.
Unfortunately, we are unable to use your project idea as submitted.
b.
The company is cutting costs by postponing any new projects until next year.
c.
Our company is unable to move ahead on new projects at this time.
d.
According to company policy, no new projects may be initiated.
e.
Thank you for your interesting idea, although it is impossible to implement at this time.
64. When using the indirect organizational plan, you can communicate the bad news by doing all of the
following except
a.
placing it in the middle of a paragraph.
b.
including it in the same sentence with a reason.
c.
introducing it after the word but or however.
d.
stressing what you can do instead of what you can't do.
e.
using impersonal wording to distance the reader from the news.
65. Which of the following is not a problem that you should avoid when ending a bad-news message?
a.
apologizing
b.
anticipating problems
c.
inviting needless communication
d.
sounding selfish
e.
expressing confidence
66. Which of the following is the most effective closing sentence for a bad-news message?
a.
The service department can provide information gathered from customer feedback.
b.
Once again, I'm sorry we can't afford to implement your suggested customer research
project.
c.
If you encounter additional problems, please let me know.
d.
Feel free to call on me if I can be of further assistance to your department.
e.
Although your proposed research would be beneficial, company policy forbids budget
increases.
67. Which of these statements is the most effective closing a bad-news message?
a.
I am very sorry we cannot help you in this area.
b.
Please let me know if you have any further questions.
c.
I'll be glad to respond to any further questions.
d.
I trust you'll understand our course of action.
e.
The new store hours are sure to make it convenient for you to stop by.
68. Of the following, the least effective way to end a bad-news message is to offer
a.
best wishes.
b.
a counterproposal.
c.
subtle sales promotion.
d.
an apology.
e.
alternative sources of assistance.
69. Writing a message in which you reject someone's idea can be a challenge because
a.
few form letters exist on which to model your letter.
b.
you may have to take action against the person if the idea comes up again.
c.
the person has probably invested considerable time in developing the idea.
d.
you want to subtly suggest that the reader refrain from submitting more ideas.
e.
you are more concerned with justifying the decision than with retaining the person's
goodwill.
70. Which of the following sentences would be most effective in a letter communicating the bad news that
an employee's idea is being rejected?
a.
I hope you realize that no project such as the one you propose has ever been approved
here.
b.
Your proposal will not be considered until you submit an accounting of all costs.
c.
It is impossible to move ahead with your idea at this time because we lack the proper
machinery.
d.
I'm sincerely sorry, but we cannot give you the resources you need for this new project.
e.
Once our budget allows for equipment upgrades, we will be able to handle this type of
project.
71. One general guideline for writing a message saying that you are not granting a routine favor is to
a.
use the indirect organizational plan.
b.
assume that the reader expects a negative response.
c.
provide a lengthy list of reasons.
d.
avoid offering any justification.
e.
mention your refusal in the first paragraph.
72. When refusing a request for a significant favor, you should
a.
use the direct organizational approach.
b.
write a routine response.
c.
offer a buffer before saying "no."
d.
emphasize the negative news.
e.
write in the spirit of reciprocity.
73. When you use the direct organizational plan in a message refusing a small favor, you should
a.
save the bad news for the final paragraph.
b.
present the bad news without any introduction.
c.
reciprocate to maintain the reader's future goodwill.
d.
use a polite buffer and explain your rationale in a few words.
e.
offer a brief, sincere apology in your first paragraph.
74. Email is often used in business for conveying internal bad news and is affective in that it
a.
allows the sender to determine precise wording.
b.
gives the reader time to respond.
c.
ensures a consistent decision when sent to employees.
d.
all of these are correct.
75. You may want to use the indirect plan to communicate bad news when writing to this audience:
a.
an employee who reports to you and is expecting a "yes" answer
b.
a customer who is unlikely to respond emotionally
c.
a reader who is expecting a "no" response
d.
a supervisor who prefers a straightforward, direct message
76. In explaining your reasons for refusing a claim, you should
a.
lecture the reader about what went wrong.
b.
use personal language, such as you and your.
c.
accept clear responsibility for the problem.
d.
not appear to accept responsibility for the problem.
e.
avoid explaining why the claim is being denied.
77. One reason to avoid refusing a claim in the first paragraph is that you
a.
lack the spirit of reciprocity.
b.
may lose the reader's goodwill.
c.
leave a strong buffer to justify your decision.
d.
should use the direct organizational plan.
e.
want to clarify your rationale immediately.
78. If you want to offer a compromise rather than rejecting a customer's claim outright, you should
a.
place the compromise just before the closing or make it a part of the closing.
b.
position the counteroffer in the first paragraph.
c.
buffer the compromise within the middle paragraph.
d.
mention the compromise before giving the bad news.
e.
use a complex or compound sentence.
79. When you include resale in a letter refusing a customer's claim, you are doing all of the following
except
a.
restating some of the benefits that led the reader to buy the product in the first place.
b.
encouraging the reader to continue buying from your firm.
c.
using subtle language to persuade without annoying.
d.
rebuilding the customer's confidence in the product.
e.
providing an appropriate buffer to cushion the bad news.
80. To retain goodwill and help the reader "accept" the bad news you must
a.
show that the matter was taken seriously and the solution was objective and fair
b.
just tell them the company policy
c.
explain that it has always been done this way
d.
apologize
81. Which of the following is classified as an internal bad-news announcement?
a.
writing to refuse a request to address a national convention
b.
writing to refuse a small favor requested by a colleague
c.
informing a customer that you will not provide an adjustment
d.
notifying all department heads of an immediate budget freeze
e.
writing to deny a customer additional credit
82. You can use the direct plan in a bad-news announcement if
a.
readers will not be personally disappointed.
b.
readers will be personally affected by the situation.
c.
you wish to buffer the bad news.
d.
you want to retain the readers' goodwill.
e.
you are presenting the rationale first.
83. The purpose of including both personal and impersonal language in a bad-news message is to
a.
separate readers from bad news and associate them with good news.
b.
associate readers with good news and separate them from bad news.
c.
avoid assuming any responsibility for the situation.
d.
provide a smooth transition from opening to buffer to closing.
e.
imply that the effect will be routine and therefore minimal.
84. Assume that you must write a memo to company employees announcing that the Internal Revenue
Service has filed suit against the company. Which of the following sentences would most effectively
reassure your readers?
a.
On behalf of top management, I apologize for any disruption in work that this legal action
may cause.
b.
Unlike so many other firms indicted for violations of the tax code, our company has done
nothing wrong.
c.
We believe the company will be able to function normally during this investigation.
d.
The exact nature of this baseless legal action will be announced at a later date.
e.
The top management team is meeting today to decide on the company's course of action.
85. To retain the reader's goodwill:
a.
State the bad news in the first sentence of the first paragraph
b.
Use positive language, stressing what you can do rather than what you cannot do
c.
Give the best reason under the circumstances showing benefits to the company
d.
Repeat the bad news in several paragraphs and remind the reader in closing
86. If there is some bad news about your organization, and your readers have already heard some of this
bad news, you should
a.
use the indirect organizational plan.
b.
use emotional language to demonstrate empathy.
c.
confirm the news early and offer more information.
d.
use a longer buffer paragraph to cushion the effect.
e.
subordinate subtle goodwill language.
SHORT ANSWER
87. What are the two main objectives of a bad-news message, and how can you achieve them?
88. Andrew Grove, co-founder of Intel Corporation, said, "The worse the news, the more effort that should
go into communicating it." Do you agree or disagree? Why?
89. What factors have a major impact on the content and organization of a bad-news message?
90. When is it appropriate to use the direct organizational plan for a bad-news message?
91. Explain when to use an indirect plan for delivering bad news.
92. Describe the five characteristics of an effective opening buffer for a bad-news message.
93. Assume that you are refusing a request to provide free software for each participant at a conference.
List four types of effective buffers, and then write an effective buffer for each type that you listed.
94. What should you keep in mind when discussing the reasons in a bad-news message?
95. How can you subordinate negative news?
96. Should an apology be included in a bad-news message? Why or why not?
97. What are four common errors to avoid when ending a bad-news message? Provide an example of each.
98. Why is the counterproposal an effective ending to a bad-news message? Give an example of a
situation in which a counterproposal might be appropriate.
99. Why must a writer be careful when rejecting a person's idea or proposal?
100. List three types of bad-news replies discussed in the textbook. Provide an example of a situation
wherein each type of reply is appropriate.
101. How does the organizational plan for refusing a "big" favor differ from the organizational plan for
refusing a routine favor?
102. What factors should you consider when refusing a claim?
103. What should you consider when writing bad-news announcements? Give some examples of bad-news
announcements.
104. What type of action should be used if the newspapers reveal information about a product recall before
your organization has had time to address the issue?

Trusted by Thousands of
Students

Here are what students say about us.

Copyright ©2022 All rights reserved. | CoursePaper is not sponsored or endorsed by any college or university.