Journalism Chapter 6 Homework Beginning in the late 1920s, surveys were conducted to determine the most popular stations and programs with various audience groupings

Document Type
Homework Help
Book Title
Keith's Radio Station: Broadcast-- Internet-- and Satellite 9th Edition
Authors
Bruce Mims, John Allen Hendricks
Chapter 6: Research
The Radio Station
Chapter 6: Highlights
Beginning in the late 1920s, surveys were conducted to determine the most
popular stations and programs with various audience groupings. Early surveys
(and their methods) included C.E. Hooper, Inc. (telephone), CAB (telephone), and
The Pulse (in-person). In 1968, RADAR (telephone to 6,000 households) began to
provide information for networks. The current leader among local market
audience surveys is Arbitron (PPM and week-long diary) which was purchased by
Nielsen and rebranded as Nielsen Audio in 2013.
A station’s primary listening locations are designated as the
DMA®.
The Arbitron 7-day diary logs time tuned to a stations; station call
letters or program name; whether AM, FM or satellite; where
listening occurred; and the listeners age, gender, and area of
residence.
With today’s highly fragmented audiences, advertisers and agencies are
less comfortable buying just ratings numbers and look for audience
qualities. Programmers must consider not only the age and gender of the
target audience but also their lifestyles, values, and behavior.
Arbitron successor Nielsen Audio has announced intentions to
increase PPM sample sizes and focus on improving efforts to
recruit African American and Hispanic panelists.
Station in-house surveyors use telephone, computer, website,
face-to-face and mail methods.

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