Type
Solution Manual
Book Title
Marketing 5th Edition
ISBN 13
978-0077729028

978-0077729028 Chapter 18 Lecture Note

April 8, 2019
Chapter 18
Integrated Marketing Communications
Tools For Instructors
· Brief Chapter Outline
· Learning Objectives
· Chapter Overview (“Summing Up”)
· Extended Chapter Outline with Teaching Tips
· PowerPoint Slides with Teaching Notes
· Answers to End of Chapter Learning Aids
· Chapter Case Study
· Additional Teaching Tips
Brief Chapter Outline
Communicating with Consumers
Elements of an Integrated Marketing Communication Strategy
Planning For and Measuring IMC Success
Summing Up
End of Chapter Learning Aids
Chapter Case Study: How Integrated is Volvo’s IMC Strategy?
Learning Objectives
LO1 Identify the components of the communication process.
LO2 Explain the four steps in the AIDA model.
LO3 Describe the various integrative communication channels.
LO4 Explain the methods used to allocate the integrated marketing communications (IMC) budget.
LO5 Identify marketing metrics used to measure IMC success.
Chapter Overview (“Summing Up”)
LO1 Identify the components of the communication process.
The communication process begins with a sender, which provides the message to a transmitter that
develops or encodes the message for transmission through a communication channel. When a recipient
receives the message, it may have been altered by noise in the environment. To find out, the sender
needs to receive some form of feedback from the recipient.
LO2 Explain the four steps in the AIDA model.
Awareness is the first “thinking” step, during which the consumer simply recognizes a brand or
product. During the interest step, the consumer starts to “feel” and become intrigued enough to explore
the product or brand. This interest then leads to another feeling, namely, desire for the marketed item.
Finally, to be successful, marketing communication must prompt an action: a purchase, a commitment,
a recommendation, or whatever else the company is trying to get consumers to do.
LO3 Describe the various integrative communication channels.
Advertising has long been the primary channel for marketing communication and is still a constant
presence, but other media channels have become more and more prominent. For example, direct
marketing media options, particularly online options, have increased in recent years. Outbound direct
marketing telephone calls have declined, but Internet-based technologies like e-mail and m-commerce
have increased. Public relations also has become increasingly important as other media forms become
more expensive and as consumers grow more skeptical of commercial messages. With regard to new
and electronic media, the wealth of recent options include websites, corporate blogs, and social media
such as YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter.
LO4 Explain the methods used to allocate the integrated marketing communications (IMC)
budget.
Various rule-of-thumb methods rely on prior sales and communication activities to determine the best
allocation. For example, the competitive parity method sets the budget so that the share of
communication expenses equals the firm’s share of the market. The percentage-of-sales method, just as
it sounds, uses a fixed percentage of sales as the amount of the budget. In contrast, the
objective-and-task method establishes specific communication objectives, identifies which media can
best attain those objectives, and then determines the related costs to expend.
LO5 Identify marketing metrics used to measure IMC success.
Marketers rely on a mix of traditional and nontraditional measures to determine IMC success. Because
potential customers generally need to be exposed to IMC messages several times before they will buy,
firms estimate the degree to which customers are exposed to a message by multiplying frequency (the
number of times an audience is exposed to a message) by reach (the percentage of the target population
exposed to a specific marketing communication). Measuring Internet IMC effectiveness requires
different measures, such as click-through tracking that measures how many times users click on banner
advertising on websites.
Extended Chapter Outline With Teaching Tips
I. Communicating With Consumers (PPT
slide 18-5)
A. The Communication Process (PPT slide 18-5)
1. The Sender
2. The Transmitter
3. Encoding
4. The Communication Channel
5. The Receiver
6. Noise
7. Feedback Loop
B. How Consumers Perceive Communication (PPT slide 18-6)
1. Receivers Decode Messages Differently (PPT slide 18-7)
2. Senders Adjust Messages According to the Medium and Receivers’ Traits
C. The AIDA Model (PPT slide 18-8)
1. Awareness (PPT slide 18-10)
2. Interest (PPT slide 18-11)
3. Desire (PPT slide 18-12)
4. Action (PPT slide 18-13)
5. The Lagged Effect (PPT slide 18-14)
Check Yourself: Several questions are offered for students to check their understanding of core
concepts. (PPT slide 18-15)
1. What are different steps in the communication process?
Answer: The different steps in the communication process are: The message originates from the sender,
who must be clearly identified to the intended audience. The sender works with the creative
department, whether in-house or from a marketing (or advertising) agency, to develop marketing
2. What is the AIDA model?
Answer: The AIDA model suggests that Awareness leads to Interests, which lead to Desire, which leads
to Action. At each stage, the consumer makes judgments about whether to take the next step in the
II. Elements Of An Integrated Marketing
Communication Strategy (PPT slide 18-16)
A. Advertising (PPT slide 18-17)
B. Public Relations (PPT slide 18-18)
C. Sales Promotions (PPT slide 18-19)
D. Personal Selling (PPT slide 18-20)
E. Direct Marketing (PPT slide 18-21)
F. Online Marketing (PPT slide 18-23)
1. Web Site (PPT slide 18-24)
2. Blogs (PPT slide 18-25)
3. Social Media (PPT slide 18-26)
Check Yourself: Several questions are offered for students to check their understanding of core
concepts. (PPT slide 18-27)
1. What are the different elements of an IMC program?
Answer: The different elements of an IMC program are advertising, personal selling, sales promotion,
public relations, direct marketing, and electronic media.
III. Planning For And Measuring Imc Success
(PPT slide 18-28)
A. Goals
B. Setting and Allocating the IMC Budget (PPT slide 18-29)
C. Measuring Success Using Marketing Metrics (PPT slide
18-31)
1. Traditional Media
2. Web-Based Media
Check Yourself: Several questions are offered for students to check their understanding of core
concepts. (PPT slide 18-36)
1. Why is the objective-and-task method of setting an IMC budget better than the rule-of-thumb
methods?
2. How do firms use GRP to evaluate the effectiveness of traditional media?
Answer: When measuring IMC success, the firm should examine when and how often consumers have
3. How would a firm evaluate the effectiveness of its Google advertising?

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