Type
Solution Manual
Book Title
Marketing 5th Edition
ISBN 13
978-0077729028

978-0077729028 Chapter 10 Slides

April 8, 2019
Powerpoint Slides With Teaching Notes
Power Point Slide Teaching Notes
10-1: Marketing Research
10-2: Learning Objectives These are the learning objectives for this
chapter.
10-3: Disney Ask students: How did Disney conduct
research and what did they learn?
Students should realize that exploratory
research was very important.
How should Disney deal with the backlash
among privacy experts and some consumers?
10-4: McDonald’s Makeover Ask students: This clip demonstrates how
McDonald’s used observational research to
identify and understand their various target
markets.
Note: Please make sure that the video file is
located in the same folder as the PowerPoint
slides.
10-5: Market Research Outcome It appears from the message in the ad that
research showed that consumers did not like to
open the cans it took an “easy” product and
made it easier.
10-6: Marketing Research Consists of a set of techniques and principles
for systematically collecting, recoding,
analyzing and interpreting data that can aid
decision makers involved in marketing goods,
services or ideas
The marketing research function links firms
and organizations to their customers through
data.
By collecting data from customers, firms can
better deliver products and services designed to
meet their needs
10-7: What Would You Do? Confidentiality is one of the first rules under
the Code of Ethics.
Aaron should not give information to the client
unless the research respondents have consented
to his doing so.
Bottom Line: Marketing research should be
used only to produce unbiased, factual
information.
This web link brings you to the Council of
American Survey Research Organizations code
of ethics
10-8: The Marketing Research Process Answers to some research questions are readily
accessible, as a simple data search would show.
10-9: Step 1: Defining the Objectives and
Research Needs
To determine whether to conduct research, two
questions must be addressed:
What?
How?
10-10: Step 2: Designing the Research
Project
In this step, researchers identify the type of
data needed and determine the type of research
necessary to collect it.
10-11: Step 3: Data Collection Process After answering why and how, researchers
must determine where they can find the data.
Discuss how the types of data required
determine the methods used to collect them.
If you can connect to your college library
look at some of the data sources at your own
school. Databases like mintel, tablebase, ABI
inform and Business Source Premier are
excellent sources of data.
Group activity: As a group, tackle a problem
for a company (e.g., local retailer who appears
to be losing customers), For this problem, list
several research questions that secondary data
can answer. Then list several questions that
require primary data.
10-12: Step 4: Analyzing Data The problem today is not too little data but, in
many instances, too much. Firms are drowning
in data, and their challenge is to convert that
data into information.
For the cookie taste test example discussed
earlier, suppose the average mean for the group
who saw the national brand cookie was 5.4
(1=poor taste and 7=great taste) and the store
brand cookie was (2.3).
These two means are significantly different. It
would be important for the students to realize
that the data helps marketing managers make
decisions in this case creating and
cultivating that the brand is important.
10-13: Step 5: Presenting Results A typical marketing research report would start
with a two page executive summary.
This would highlight the objectives of the
study, methodology and key insights.
The body of the report would go through the
objectives of the study, issues examined,
methodology, analysis and results, insights and
managerial implications.
We would end with conclusions and any
limitations or caveats.
Many consultants today, provide an executive
summary, power point presentation of the
report, questionnaire and tabulated study
results
10-14: Check Yourself 1. Define objectives and research needs,
designing the research project, deciding on
the data collection process and collecting
the data. analyze and interpret the data,
prepare the findings for presentation.
2. Secondary data are pieces of information
that have been collected from other
sources. Primary data are data collected to
address specific research needs, usually
through observation, focus groups,
interviews, surveys, or experiments.
10-15: Syndicated Data Secondary data are plentiful and free, whereas
syndicated data generally are more detailed but
can be very costly.
Ask students: Why might firms subscribe to a
data service and collect their own primary and
secondary data at the same time?
10-16: Scanner Research Students may not remember a time before
grocery stores used scanners, but highlight how
the installation of scanners created a huge new
data source for marketers.
Ask students: What can researchers take from
scanner data?
Students might note that researchers can
discover which consumers purchase what
products together and how often. They also can
immediately track the impact of any price or
promotional adjustments. This web link brings
you to IRI homepage explore their many
products with the students.
10-17: Panel Research In recent years, response rates to marketing
research surveys have declined, which has
increased usage of research panels.
10-18: Internal Secondary Data Every day, consumers provide wide-ranging
data that get stored in increasingly large
databases.
Ask students: How might firms and
organizations collect information about you?
Do you always know when you are providing
such data? Who uses these data?
In the United States, firms use opt-out
programs, so when consumers fill out a
registration form or application, the firm
automatically has permission to market to that
customer and share information with its
partners, unless consumers explicitly revoke
this permission. In contrast, the EU regulations
state that customers must opt-in to such
information uses.
10-19: Check Yourself 1. Secondary sources can be taken from
internal sources, including the company’s
sales invoices, customer lists, and other
reports generated by the company itself.
Secondary data might come from free or
very inexpensive external sources, such as
census data, information from trade
associations, and reports published in
magazines.
10-20: Step 3: Data Collection Process Managers commonly use several exploratory
research methods: observation, in-depth
interviewing, focus group interviews, and
projective techniques.
If the firm is ready to move beyond
preliminary insights, it likely is ready to
engage in conclusive research, which provides
the information needed to confirm those
insights and which managers can use to pursue
appropriate courses of action.
10-21: Data Collection Example of observation: When a museum
wanted to know which exhibits people visited
most often, it conducted a unique study to
determine the wear patterns in the floor.
This “human trace” evidence allowed the
museum to study flow patterns.
Interviews provide extremely valuable
information, because researchers can probe
respondents to elicit more information about
interesting topics.
Focus groups similarly provide a snapshot of
customers’ opinions and allow some follow-up
but also are relatively fast and inexpensive to
conduct.
Video: “The Brave New World of
Shopper-Tracking Technology”
Ask students what are the advantages to a
company in tracking a customers behavior
inside a store?
Ask students what are the advantages to a
company of combining a customers in-store
behavior with their online shopping behavior?
10-22: Describing the benefits They might have observed how people tested
the durability of bags perhaps several turned
them upside down.
They may have conducted interviews about
problems, and leaking was a very big issue.
Finally, during a focus group, they might have
had one participant mention leaking and
another to discuss how you would test for
leaking – turning the bag upside down.
10-23: Check Yourself 1. Observation, In-Depth Interviews, Focus
Groups, and Social Media.
10-24: Survey Research Marketing research relies heavily on
questionnaires, and questionnaire design is
virtually an art form.
Ask students the advantages and disadvantages
of each type of question (unstructured and
structured).
Group activity: Create a questionnaire. First
determine the form of the questions (i.e.,
structured versus unstructured).
On the basis of these questions, what types of
analysis will you be able to perform on your
collected data?
10-25: Web Surveying Ask students: Do you fill out internet surveys?
If so, were you honest in your responses?
Ask students whether they took their time
with the survey and gave quality responses.
10-26: Using Web Surveying The Internet offers researchers a new way to
reach customers, but its use requires
adaptations and new research methods.
10-27: Experimental Research Using an experiment, McDonald’s would
“test” the price of a new menu item to
determine which is the most profitable
This web link is to a YouTube ad (always
check before class) by Microsoft for Vista. It
is called the Mojave experiment and is
designed to show the relationship between the
Vista name and “liking” of a computer system.
An example of an experiment could involve
two groups of subjects. One taste cookies with
a national brand and the other with a store
brand. Each group rates the cookie on a seven
point scale from poor to great taste. The group
with the branded name tends to rate the cookie
as better tasting, demonstrating the power of a
brand name.
Group Activity: Ask students to design a taste
test experiment for Coke vs. Pepsi.
10-28: Advantages and Disadvantages of
Secondary and Primary Data
A summary of the advantages and
disadvantages of each type of research.
10-29: Check Yourself 1. Define objectives and research needs,
designing the research project, deciding on
the data collection process and collecting
the data. analyze and interpret the data,
prepare the findings for presentation.
2. Secondary data are pieces of information
that have been collected from other
sources. Primary data are data collected to
address specific research needs, usually
through observation, focus groups,
interviews, surveys, or experiments.
10-30: Debating Domestic Eavesdropping This video covers domestic eavesdropping as
companies and the government get more
technical, they are able to collect much more
information.
The question in this video is whether the
government has the right to eavesdrop on
citizen’s communications.
Note: Please make sure that the video file is
located in the same folder as the PowerPoint
slides.
10-31: The Ethics of Using Customer
Information
This video covers domestic eavesdropping as
companies and the government get more
technical, they are able to collect much more
information.
The question in this video is whether the
government has the right to eavesdrop on
citizen’s communications.
10-32: Check Yourself 1. Marketers must adhere to legislative and
company policies, as well as respect
consumers’ desires for privacy.
2. As technology continues to advance
though, the potential threats to consumers’
personal information grow in number and
intensity.

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