Type
Solution Manual
Book Title
Business Communication: Building Critical Skills 6th Edition
ISBN 13
978-0073403267

978-0073403267 Chapter 21 Answers to Textbook Assignments

April 6, 2019
Module 21 - Proposals and Progress Reports
Part 2: Answers to Textbook Assignments
Questions for Comprehension
21.1 What three components belong in a purpose statement? (LO 21-2)
The organizational problem or conflict.
21.2 What is an RFP? (LO 21-3)
21.3 How does the RFP relate to the organization of the proposal? (LO 21-3)
RFPs typically specify the content of proposals, including which sections to include and in
what order. In fact, some RFPs—particularly those issued by government agencies—require
© 2014 by McGraw-Hill Education. This is proprietary material solely for authorized instructor use. Not authorized for sale or distribution
in any manner. This document may not be copied, scanned, duplicated, forwarded, distributed, or posted on a website, in whole or part.
21-1
Module 21 - Proposals and Progress Reports
21.4 In the budget for a proposal, why isn’t it to your advantage to try to ask for the
smallest amount of money possible? (LO 21-3)
Asking for too little can suggest the writer doesn’t understand what must be done to solve the
problem. Writers should develop budgets that are within the realm of possibility for the
organization and be specific with figures. However, allowing some “cushion” with figures is
21.5 What should you do if you have information you want to put in a proposal that the
RFP doesn’t call for? (LO 21-3)
Stick to what the RFP specifies—some proposals get disqualified from consideration if they
don’t follow the RFP exactly. If writers have additional information, share it later; some
organizations take proposals that make the “first cut” and then contact writers for additional
21.6 How can you learn about your audience’s hot buttons? (LO 21-4)
Research is the best way. Start by asking people who may know something about the
21.7 How do you decide whether to write a chronological, task, or recommendation
progress report? (LO 21-5)
Writers should determine which type to use based on audience needs and the type of project.
Chronological progress reports describe actions in sequence, typically from least recent to
21.8 Writing a Proposal for a Student Report (LO 21-3)
Having students write proposals as a prelude to their reports is useful whether you’re
assigning a full formal report, a short letter, or a memo report. You could also assign the
proposal without requiring students to write the report. Use Appendix 21-A through
Appendix 21-E to show students an example.
© 2014 by McGraw-Hill Education. This is proprietary material solely for authorized instructor use. Not authorized for sale or distribution
in any manner. This document may not be copied, scanned, duplicated, forwarded, distributed, or posted on a website, in whole or part.
21-2
Module 21 - Proposals and Progress Reports
21.9 Writing a Chronological Progress Report (LO 21-5)
To Writing a Task Progress Report (LO 21-5)
21.11 Writing a Chronological Progress Report for a Group Report (LO 21-5)
These assignments motivate students to carry out the work schedule they have proposed. It
also provides an “early warning system”—if students are having problems, one finds out and
can suggest solutions. Because it’s short and easy, most students do well on it, so it raises
Polishing Your Prose: Mixing Verb Tenses (Odd-numbered answers are in the back of
the textbook.)
Several answers are possiblehere are likely ones.
2. Norm gains 38 years of experience working with a diverse range of clients in South and
Central America.
4. If we take a plane to Louisville next Friday, we will arrive on Saturday afternoon.
© 2014 by McGraw-Hill Education. This is proprietary material solely for authorized instructor use. Not authorized for sale or distribution
in any manner. This document may not be copied, scanned, duplicated, forwarded, distributed, or posted on a website, in whole or part.
21-3
Module 21 - Proposals and Progress Reports
© 2014 by McGraw-Hill Education. This is proprietary material solely for authorized instructor use. Not authorized for sale or distribution
in any manner. This document may not be copied, scanned, duplicated, forwarded, distributed, or posted on a website, in whole or part.
21-4

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