Type
Solution Manual
Book Title
Business Communication: Building Critical Skills 6th Edition
ISBN 13
978-0073403267

978-0073403267 Chapter 14 Answers to Textbook Assignments

April 6, 2019
Module 14 - Editing for Grammar and Punctuation
Part 2: Answers to Textbook Assignments
Questions for Comprehension
14.1 Why is it better to fix errors in grammar and punctuation only after you’ve revised
for content, organization, and style? (LO 14-1 to LO 14-7)
14.2 What words make clauses subordinate and thus require more than a comma to join
clauses? (LO 14-2)
14.3 What is parallel structure? When should you use it? (LO 14-2)
14.4 What is a sentence fragment? How do you fix it? (LO 14-3)
A sentence fragment is a group of words that is not a complete sentence but is punctuated as if it
were a complete sentence. Solutions include adding the parts that are missing from the sentence
14.5 Consuela sees a lot of errors in the writing of managers at her workplace. If they
don’t know or don’t care about correctness, why should she? (LO 14-1)
Just because managers write or edit poorly does not mean Consuela should, too. Beyond the fact
© 2014 by McGraw-Hill Education. This is proprietary material solely for authorized instructor use. Not authorized for sale or distribution in any
manner. This document may not be copied, scanned, duplicated, forwarded, distributed, or posted on a website, in whole or part.
14-1
Module 14 - Editing for Grammar and Punctuation
14.6 After surveying readers in her workplace, (problem 14.8 below), Camilla finds that
most of them are not bothered by errors in grammar and punctuation. Does that
mean that she doesn’t need to fix surface errors? (LO 14-1)
Camilla should continue to fix her surface errors. She should also tactfully show or suggest
14.7 Joe knows that his variety of English isn’t the privileged variety, but he is afraid that
using standard edited English will make him seem “uppity” to people in his home
community. Should he try to use standard edited grammar and pronunciation? Why
or why not? (LO 14-1)
This question addresses the issue of audience analysis, covered in significant detail in Module 2.
14.8 Identifying Audience Concerns about Grammar (LO 14-1 to LO 14-7)
The survey works best if students approach as many people in the organization as possible,
across a broad range of job responsibilities and levels of management. Some people may feel
14.9 Making Subjects and Verbs Agree (LO 14-2)
In some cases, more than one answer is possible. Here are likely ones.
1. Corinne is going to tour the Hokaido facility in December.
2. To simplify things, we are planning to take the GMATs at the same time.
© 2014 by McGraw-Hill Education. This is proprietary material solely for authorized instructor use. Not authorized for sale or distribution in any
manner. This document may not be copied, scanned, duplicated, forwarded, distributed, or posted on a website, in whole or part.
14-2
Module 14 - Editing for Grammar and Punctuation
14.10 Using the Right Pronoun (LO 14-2)
In some cases, more than one answer is possible. Here are likely ones.
1. Bryan e-mailed Todd Winthrop at our Southfield office yesterday, but he didn’t receive
the message till Thursday.
2. Ramon, Paulette, and I reserved a company car for the three-hour trip to Anaheim this
afternoon.
14.11 Fixing Dangling and Misplaced Modifiers (LO 14-2)
In some cases, more than one answer is possible. Here are likely ones.
1. At the staff meeting, Eleanor reported there were two delayed flights.
2. My mom let me drive the car around the block for the first time when I was 15.
14.12 Creating Parallel Structure (LO 14-2)
1. To narrow a web search,
Put quotation marks around a phrase when you want an exact term.
Use wild cards (usually an asterisk) to find plurals and other forms of a word.
Read the instructions on the search engine itself to teach you advanced search
techniques.
2. Men drink more alcoholic beverages than women drink alcoholic beverages.
3. Each issue of Hospice Care has articles from four different perspectives: legislative,
14.13 Correcting Sentence Errors (LO 14-3)
Several answers are possible. Here are likely ones.
1. You can expect our fleet cars to be in pristine working order. You can also enjoy such
amenities as cruise control, GPS tracking, and satellite radio.
2. Without filling out the appropriate requisition forms, Kelly purchased two fax machines,
or so the disciplinary action reported indicated.
3. Customers can order through the web page, our 1-800 number, or traditional mail.
14.14 Providing Punctuation within Sentences (LO 14-5)
Several answers are possible. Here are likely ones.
1. Office work—especially at your desk—can create back, shoulder, neck, or wrist strain.
2. I searched for “vacation” and “vacation planning” on Google and Alta Vista.
3. I suggest putting a bulletin board in the rear hallway and posting all the interviewers
photos on it.
4. Analyzing audiences is the same for marketing and writing: you have to identify who the
audiences are, understand how to motivate them, and choose the best channel to reach
them.
© 2014 by McGraw-Hill Education. This is proprietary material solely for authorized instructor use. Not authorized for sale or distribution in any
manner. This document may not be copied, scanned, duplicated, forwarded, distributed, or posted on a website, in whole or part.
14-4
Module 14 - Editing for Grammar and Punctuation
5. The more you know about your audience—who they are, what they buy, where they shop
—the more relevant and effective you can make your ad.
14.15 Fixing Errors in Grammar and Punctuation (LO 14-5)
Several answers are possible. Here are likely ones.
a. Companies are finding it to their advantage to cultivate their suppliers. Partnerships
between a company and its suppliers can yield hefty payoffs for both company and
supplier. One example is Bailey Controls, an Ohio-headquartered company. Bailey
b. Entrepreneur Trip Hawkins appears in Japanese ads for the video game system his
company designed. “It plugs into the future!” he says in one ad, in a cameo spliced into
c. Midsize firms employing between 100 and 1000 people represent only 4% of companies
in the U.S. but create 33% of all new jobs. One observer attributes their success to being
small enough to take advantage of economic opportunities agilely but big enough to have
access to credit and to operate on a national or even international scale. The biggest
© 2014 by McGraw-Hill Education. This is proprietary material solely for authorized instructor use. Not authorized for sale or distribution in any
manner. This document may not be copied, scanned, duplicated, forwarded, distributed, or posted on a website, in whole or part.
14-5
Module 14 - Editing for Grammar and Punctuation
Polishing Your Prose: Matters on Which Experts Disagree (Odd-numbered answers are in
the back of the textbook.)
Several answers are possiblehere are likely ones.
2. Max told us that everyone gets his or her chance eventually. The trick is to be ready to take it
when it happens.
4. He said it was more important to serve customers successfully than simply to sell them
products.
© 2014 by McGraw-Hill Education. This is proprietary material solely for authorized instructor use. Not authorized for sale or distribution in any
manner. This document may not be copied, scanned, duplicated, forwarded, distributed, or posted on a website, in whole or part.
14-6
Module 14 - Editing for Grammar and Punctuation
© 2014 by McGraw-Hill Education. This is proprietary material solely for authorized instructor use. Not authorized for sale or distribution in any
manner. This document may not be copied, scanned, duplicated, forwarded, distributed, or posted on a website, in whole or part.
14-7

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