Type
Solution Manual
Book Title
Business Communication: Building Critical Skills 6th Edition
ISBN 13
978-0073403267

978-0073403267 Chapter 12 Appendixes

April 6, 2019
Module 12 - Persuasive Messages
Part 3:
Appendix 12-A: Observation, Inference, or
Judgment?
Indicate whether each of the following statements is an
observation, an inference, or a judgment.
There are more than three people in this room.
The air in this room is comfortable.
Technology stocks will rise more quickly than the
general stock market in the coming year.
An investor should choose stocks based on the
dividends or profit they will bring.
Commencement exercises will be held for
graduating students at the end of the spring term.
Each state has two senators in the federal Congress.
Improving race relations is the biggest problem
facing the United States.
© 2014 by McGraw-Hill Education. This is proprietary material solely for authorized instructor use. Not authorized for sale or distribution in any
manner. This document may not be copied, scanned, duplicated, forwarded, distributed, or posted on a website, in whole or part.
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Module 12 - Persuasive Messages
Appendix 12-B: Letter of Recommendation
Example
September 14, 2009
Ms. Mary E. Areas
Personnel Director
Cyclops Communication Technologies
1050 South Sierra Bonita Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90019
Dear Ms. Areas:
Colleen Kangas was hired as a clerk typist by Bay City Information Systems on April 4, 1998 and
was promoted to Administrative Assistant on August 1, 1999. At her performance appraisal in June,
I recommended that she be promoted again. She is an intelligent young woman with good work
habits and a good knowledge of computer software.
As an Administrative Assistant, Colleen not only handles routine duties such as processing time
cards, ordering supplies, and entering data, but also screens calls for two marketing specialists,
answers basic questions about Bay City Information Systems, compiles the statistics I need for my
monthly reports, and investigates special assignments for me. In the past eight months, she has
investigated freight charges, inventory department hardware, and microfiche files. I need only to
give her general directions: she has a knack for tracking down information quickly and summarizing
it accurately.
Although the departments workload has increased during the year, Colleen manages her time so
that everything gets done on schedule. She is consistently poised and friendly under pressure. Her
willingness to work overtime on occasion is particularly remarkable considering that she has been
going to college part-time ever since she joined our firm.
At Bay City Information Systems, Colleen uses Microsoft Word and Access software. She tells me
that she has also used WordPerfect and PowerPoint in her college classes.
If Colleen were staying in San Francisco, we would want to keep her. She has the potential either to
become an Executive Secretary or to move into line or staff work, especially once she completes her
degree. I recommend her highly.
Sincerely,
Jeanne Cederlind
Vice President, Marketing
© 2014 by McGraw-Hill Education. This is proprietary material solely for authorized instructor use. Not authorized for sale or distribution in any
manner. This document may not be copied, scanned, duplicated, forwarded, distributed, or posted on a website, in whole or part.
12-2
Module 12 - Persuasive Messages
Appendix 12-C:
A Checklist for Direct Request Messages
Direct Requests
If the message is a memo, does the subject line indicate the request? Is the subject line specific
enough to differentiate this message from others on the same subject?
Does the first paragraph summarize the request or the specific topic of the message?
Does the message give all of the relevant information? Is there enough detail?
Does the message answer questions or overcome objections that readers may have without
introducing unnecessary negatives?
Does the last paragraph ask for action? Does it give a deadline if one exists and a reason for
acting promptly?
And, for all messages, not just direct requests,
Does the message use you-attitude and positive emphasis?
Is the style easy to read and friendly?
Is the visual design of the message inviting?
Is the format correct?
Does the message use standard grammar? Is it free from typos?
Originality in a direct request may come from
Good lists and visual impact.
Thinking about readers and giving details that answer their questions, overcome any objections,
and make it easier for them to do as you ask.
Adding details that show you’re thinking about a specific organization and the specific people in
that organization.
© 2014 by McGraw-Hill Education. This is proprietary material solely for authorized instructor use. Not authorized for sale or distribution in any
manner. This document may not be copied, scanned, duplicated, forwarded, distributed, or posted on a website, in whole or part.
12-3
Module 12 - Persuasive Messages
Appendix 12-D:
A Checklist for Problem-Solving Messages
Problem-Solving Persuasive Messages
If the message is a memo, does the subject line indicate the writer’s purpose or offer a reader
benefit? Does the subject line avoid making the request?
Is the problem presented as a joint problem that both the writer and reader have an interest
in solving, rather than as something the reader is being asked to do for the writer?
Does the message give all of the relevant information? Is there enough detail?
Does the message overcome objections that readers may have?
Does the message avoid phrases that sound dictatorial, condescending, or arrogant?
Does the last paragraph ask for action? Does it give a deadline if one exists and a reason for
acting promptly?
And, for all messages, not just persuasive ones,
Does the message use you-attitude and positive emphasis?
Is the style easy to read and friendly?
Is the visual design of the message inviting?
Is the format correct?
Does the message use standard grammar? Is it free from typos?
Originality in a problem-solving persuasive message may come from
A good subject line and common ground.
A clear and convincing description of the problem.
Thinking about readers and giving details that answer their questions, overcome objections,
and make it easier for them to do as you ask.
Adding details that show you’re thinking about
© 2014 by McGraw-Hill Education. This is proprietary material solely for authorized instructor use. Not authorized for sale or distribution in any
manner. This document may not be copied, scanned, duplicated, forwarded, distributed, or posted on a website, in whole or part.
12-4

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