Type
Solution Manual
Book Title
Business Communication: Building Critical Skills 6th Edition
ISBN 13
978-0073403267

978-0073403267 Chapter 11 Answers to Textbook Assignments

April 6, 2019
Module 11 - Negative Messages
Part 2: Answers to Textbook Assignments
Questions for Comprehension
11.1 How should a negative letter to customers or clients be organized? (LO 11-2)
Give the reason for the refusal before the refusal itself when you have a reason that readers will
11.2 Why is giving an alternative or a compromise, if one exists, a good idea? (LO 11-2)
Alternatives and compromises offer the reader another way to get what he or she wants, suggest
11.3 How should a negative memo to a superior be organized? (LO 11-2)
11.4 What are the most common types of buffers? (LO 11-4)
Start with any good news or positive elements the letter contains, state a fact or provide a
11.5 How do you use positive emphasis in a negative message? (LO 11-2, LO 11-3)
Students’ answers will vary. At the sentence level, avoid unnecessary negative words and
phrases and hidden negatives. However, the negative message must still be understood by the
11.6 How do you decide whether to give the negative directly or to buffer it? (LO 11-4)
When direct patterns seem too blunt, writers can consider using a buffer. As the name implies,
buffers act as a barrier or cushion to the bad news. They are neutral or positive statements that
allow the writer to delay the negative.
© 2014 by McGraw-Hill Education. This is proprietary material solely for authorized instructor use. Not authorized for sale or distribution in any
manner. This document may not be copied, scanned, duplicated, forwarded, distributed, or posted on a website, in whole or part.
11-1
Module 11 - Negative Messages
11.7 How do specific varieties of negative messages adapt the basic pattern? (LO 11-5)
Rejections and Refusals: When writing to people outside the organization, try to use a buffer.
Give an alternative if one is available. Politeness and length will help. When you are writing
internally, use your knowledge of the individual and organization to craft your message.
Disciplinary Notices and Negative Performance Appraisals: Present these directly, with no
11.8 Revising a Negative Message (LO 11-1 to LO 11-6)
There are several approaches to how this message could be revised. One would be to reorganize
this message to start with current Paragraph 3, then current Paragraph 2, then current Paragraph
11.9 Rejecting Employees’ Suggestions (LO 11-1 to LO 11-6)
11.10 Telling the Boss about a Problem (LO 11-1 to LO 11-6)
11.11 Responding to a Demand for a Refund (LO 11-1 to LO 11-6)
Mr. McCann is obviously upset about his experience at the movie theater. Acknowledging that
the projector bulbs are dimmed may be appropriate, but it may also be possible to avoid the issue
© 2014 by McGraw-Hill Education. This is proprietary material solely for authorized instructor use. Not authorized for sale or distribution in any
manner. This document may not be copied, scanned, duplicated, forwarded, distributed, or posted on a website, in whole or part.
11-2
Module 11 - Negative Messages
11.12 A Difficult Negative Message—Taking Away Extra Pay (LO 11-1 to LO 11-6)
Few employees will see a reduction in their pay as a good thing—even if the increase in the first
place was done without checking with the organization’s Human Resources Department.
Because some employees will be understandably upset, the message must use a considerate tone
and provide concrete reasons for why the extra pay program is ending. Among the reasons
11.13 Announcing the Elimination of a Position (LO 11-1 to LO 11-6)
This type of communication is always difficult to write and to receive, especially when a
person’s job is being eliminated. Encourage students to stick to the facts and what the impact of
losing the department secretary will be on remaining employees—work tasks that will need to be
taken on by other employees, etc. The e-mail should communicate that the decision to eliminate
11.14 Telling Retirees They Must Switch to HMOs (LO 11-1 to LO 11-6)
Help students understand how HMOs work, the advantages they offer (such as lower
out-of-pocket expenses), and the disadvantages they entail (such as having to get approval for
11.15 Telling a Customer an Item Is No Longer Available (LO 11-1 to LO 11-6)
Because the chair is a gift for a special occasion, Ms. Bergman is likely to be disappointed. She
may feel that having done nothing wrong, she deserves the chair she ordered, regardless of the
© 2014 by McGraw-Hill Education. This is proprietary material solely for authorized instructor use. Not authorized for sale or distribution in any
manner. This document may not be copied, scanned, duplicated, forwarded, distributed, or posted on a website, in whole or part.
11-3
Module 11 - Negative Messages
11.16 Rejecting a Suggestion (LO 11-1 to LO 11-6)
Class discussion may be necessary to help students see the company’s position, not just the
employee’s. Students should remember, though, that even if Wayne is not strongly invested in
11.17 Announcing Cost-Savings Measures (LO 11-1 to LO 11-6)
Good messages will invite input from employees on other ways to save money and will make it
clear that the measures are designed to prevent or reduce layoffs.
11.18 Closing Bill-Payment Offices (LO 11-1 to LO 11-6)
This can be presented as good news: payments will be accepted at 100 merchants. Good
11.19 Giving a Customer Less Credit Than She Wants (LO 11-1 to LO 11-6)
Successful messages will give concrete reasons why the request is not being granted and focus
on what the customer is getting instead (a $7,500 limit card). A successful message will also
11.20 Addressing a Complaint About Racism by Employees (LO 11-1 to LO 11-6)
Few, if any, organizations want to believe they’ve hired bigoted employees, but the unfortunate
reality is that discrimination happens regularly in the workplace, both to employees and to
customers. How an organization responds to claims of discrimination often demonstrates how
committed the organization is to fairness for everyone. In the case of this situation, though, the
© 2014 by McGraw-Hill Education. This is proprietary material solely for authorized instructor use. Not authorized for sale or distribution in any
manner. This document may not be copied, scanned, duplicated, forwarded, distributed, or posted on a website, in whole or part.
11-4
Module 11 - Negative Messages
Polishing Your Prose: Parallel Structure (Odd-numbered answers are in the back of the
textbook.)
Several answers are possible—here are likely ones.
2. Some of the underserved groups in the United States include African Americans, Chinese
Americans, Native Americans, and Hispanic Americans.
© 2014 by McGraw-Hill Education. This is proprietary material solely for authorized instructor use. Not authorized for sale or distribution in any
manner. This document may not be copied, scanned, duplicated, forwarded, distributed, or posted on a website, in whole or part.
11-5
Module 11 - Negative Messages
© 2014 by McGraw-Hill Education. This is proprietary material solely for authorized instructor use. Not authorized for sale or distribution in any
manner. This document may not be copied, scanned, duplicated, forwarded, distributed, or posted on a website, in whole or part.
11-6

Subscribe Now

Sign up to view full document

View Document