Communications Chapter 22 Vivid Imagery Should Used Define Things For The Audience True False Page

Document Type
Test Prep
Book Title
LaunchPad for A Pocket Guide to Public Speaking 6th Edition
Authors
Dan O'Hair, Hannah Rubenstein, Rob Stewart
Page 1
1.
The goal of informative speaking is to persuade or convince an audience.
A)
True
B)
False
2.
An informative speech advocates rather than enlightens.
A)
True
B)
False
3.
There are always some elements of persuasion in an informative speech.
A)
True
B)
False
4.
The audience is an empty vessel into which a speaker can pour facts and figures for
automatic processing.
A)
True
B)
False
5.
Audiences prefer hearing about topics that are relevant to them.
A)
True
B)
False
6.
If a speech does not offer audience members anything new, they will be offended.
A)
True
B)
False
7.
To satisfy the audience's desire to learn something new, a speaker should offer
information that is fresh and compelling.
A)
True
B)
False
8.
The audience will retain almost everything the speaker says, so the speaker should
include as much new and compelling information as possible.
A)
True
B)
False
Page 2
9.
To help the audience stay on track, a speaker should preview the main points, use clear
transitions, and use repetition.
A)
True
B)
False
10.
Using rhetorical devices such as repetition and parallelism may reinforce information
and drive home key ideas.
A)
True
B)
False
11.
Informative speech topics include events and issues, but not objects or people.
A)
True
B)
False
12.
In an informative speech, the speaker is allowed to describe or explain, but not
demonstrate.
A)
True
B)
False
13.
When defining something, a speaker identifies its essential qualities and meaning.
A)
True
B)
False
14.
You can define something by describing what it is not or by comparing it to something
with which it has something in common.
A)
True
B)
False
15.
In describing information, the speaker should provide a mental picture for the audience.
A)
True
B)
False
16.
Vivid imagery should be used to define things for the audience.
A)
True
B)
False
Page 3
17.
A speech that relies on demonstration must include an actual physical demonstration.
A)
True
B)
False
18.
The point of an explanation in a speech is to offer a vivid mental picture of the subject
under discussion.
A)
True
B)
False
19.
Using analogies in a speech is a helpful strategy to reduce audience confusion.
A)
True
B)
False
20.
Analogies are used to appeal to audience members' emotions.
A)
True
B)
False
21.
Analogies link the unfamiliar with the familiar.
A)
True
B)
False
22.
Multimodal learners combine two or more learning style preferences.
A)
True
B)
False
23.
Visual learners will greatly benefit from a speaker using presentation aids such as
pictures, charts, tables, and videos.
A)
True
B)
False
24.
The problem-solution pattern should never be used in informative speeches.
A)
True
B)
False
25.
All informative speeches must be organized using the cause-effect pattern.
A)
True
B)
False
Page 4
26.
An effective informative speech shows listeners
A)
why they should change their attitude about the topic.
B)
something they didn't previously know.
C)
the correct way to follow a procedure.
D)
why they should adopt a certain viewpoint.
27.
An informative speaker might
A)
urge listeners to change their recycling habits.
B)
persuade listeners to support the new bonding bill.
C)
explain to listeners the new services available at the student center.
D)
convince listeners to adopt new snacking habits.
28.
The goal of informative speaking is
A)
to decrease audience frustration and boredom.
B)
to influence attitudes, beliefs, values, and behaviors.
C)
to increase audience understanding and awareness.
D)
to persuade audience members to change their actions.
29.
To help the audience follow the speech, the speaker should do all of the following
EXCEPT
A)
preview main points in the introduction.
B)
avoid organizational patterns.
C)
use many transition words and phrases.
D)
employ rhetorical devices such as repetition and parallelism.
30.
Speeches about what address the impact of individuals and groups on society?
A)
people
B)
events
C)
objects or phenomena
D)
processes
31.
What kind of speeches might discuss brewing beer, lightning formation, or yoga
sequences?
A)
people
B)
events
C)
objects or phenomena
D)
processes
Page 5
32.
A speaker should focus on raising awareness and deepening understanding rather than
advocating one position over another when giving what kind of informative speech?
A)
concepts
B)
issues
C)
objects or phenomena
D)
processes
33.
Defining, describing, demonstrating, and explaining are methods of
A)
persuading your audience.
B)
entertaining your audience.
C)
informing your audience.
D)
understanding your audience.
34.
You can define a topic in all the following ways EXCEPT
A)
by describing what it is not.
B)
by comparing it to something similar.
C)
by showing visuals of it.
D)
by illustrating its root meaning.
35.
To describe information, a speaker should use language that is
A)
abstract.
B)
unfamiliar to the audience.
C)
vivid.
D)
vague.
36.
“A theory is like a set of glasses we put on to look through” is an example of
A)
a syllogism.
B)
an analogy.
C)
a rhetorical question.
D)
parallelism.
37.
An informative speech arranged by categories is arranged
A)
chronologically.
B)
topically.
C)
spatially.
D)
causally.
Page 6
Answer Key

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