Business Communication Chapter 10 1 You should avoid using he as a generic pronoun

Document Type
Test Prep
Book Title
Business Communication: In Person-- In Print-- Online 8th Edition
Authors
Amy Newman, Scot Ober
Chapter 10Writing the Report
TRUE/FALSE
1. Decision makers may prefer shorter documents as time-saving devices.
2. When you write a report you follow these steps: planning, drafting, revising, and proofreading.
3. Reports written in programs such as Microsoft Word are still common, but more companies,
particularly financial services and consulting firms, are using programs such as PowerPoint for reports
that combine text and graphics.
4. A text-based report is written as a narrative.
5. Internal proposals may be written in an email textbox.
6. For busy readers a writer must "frontload" the opening by grabbing the reader's attention in the first
paragraph.
7. Reports may be primarily text or a mix of text and graphics.
8. A report header includes the report title, subtitle, and page number.
9. "Decks" are reports that were created using presentation software such as Microsoft PowerPoint.
10. Although you may phrase your headings in a variety of ways, noun phrases are probably the most
common.
11. You should avoid using he as a generic pronoun when referring to an unidentified person.
12. You should use the verb tense (past, present, or future) that is appropriate at the time the reader reads
the report-not necessarily at the time that you wrote the report.
13. Long reports may also require a title page, cover note, executive summary, table of contents, appendix,
and a reference list.
14. To avoid plagiarism a writer must not copy someone else's idea, language, data, or report without
using source citations.
15. Do not omit relevant information from a report.
16. You can emphasize the importance of the problem discussed in a formal report by using first-person
and second-person pronouns.
17. When your report is formatted as a letter, you have the option of including headings and subheadings.
18. The purpose of selecting an organizational basis for your findings is to show order, logic, and unity.
19. The findings in most reports are organized in chronological order.
20. In a recommendation report, you should explain the other alternatives you investigated before
presenting the one you recommend.
21. For analytical and recommendation reports, the most logical organization is by criteria.
22. Conclusions are often given at the beginning of a report.
23. The direct approach is preferred when the report topic is very complex and needs detailed explanations
to help the reader understand and accept the conclusions.
24. The indirect approach is an appropriate organizational plan when you expect the reader to be resistant
to the conclusions and recommendations in your report.
25. Most formal reports use generic headings to identify the topic of each section.
26. Make your report easy to read by limiting the number of headings.
27. If you want to divide a longer report section, you should include at least two subsections.
28. When drafting the introduction to a report, include a discussion of the procedures used to gather and
analyze data.
29. The purpose of the report introduction is to provide information that the reader needs to understand the
summary.
30. The findings section is generally the largest in the report.
31. You should not only present your findings but also analyze and interpret them in the same section of
the report.
32. When summarizing the main points immediately before the conclusions and recommendations, review
for the reader by using the same wording used in the presentation.
33. Your summary should be at least one page long and possibly longer, depending on your report's
complexity and length.
34. Ending a report with a concluding statement provides a definite sense of project completion and
signals the reader not to look for additional pages.
35. To avoid repetition, do not include your conclusions and recommendations in the report's executive
summary.
36. Headings and subheadings in the table of contents should be worded as they appear in the body of the
report.
37. You should cite all primary data sources as part of the reference list at the end of your report.
38. When writing a report, use verb tenses that reflect the reader's time frame, not your time frame.
39. The amount of space you devote to an idea will emphasize or subordinate it.
40. Use previews, conclusions, and recommendations, connected by smooth transitions, to achieve
coherence and unity in a report.
41. You can paraphrase the ideas of someone else by rearranging phrases or leaving out several words.
42. Reserve direct quotation for definitions and for text passages that are so precise, clear, or noteworthy
that you cannot improve them.
43. As long as you carefully paraphrase or summarize a source, you can avoid providing documentation of
the source.
44. Facts that can be verified easily do not need to be documented in a report.
45. The three major forms for documenting the ideas, information, and quotes of other people in a report
are endnotes, footnotes, or author-date references.
46. One aspect of revising a report for style is to check that you have used active and passive voice
appropriately.
47. When proofreading a report, use a grammar software program to identify incorrect word usage and
incorrect page order.
MULTIPLE CHOICE
48. When planning a report, you should base the structure, formality, and length on
a.
the writing style you use.
b.
your decision to include supplementary parts.
c.
the needs and desires of the reader.
d.
the unity and coherence of the report.
e.
how you collect and interpret your data.
49. The most common formats for a report are
a.
memorandum, letter, and manuscript.
b.
transmittal, supplemental, and reference.
c.
formal, informal, and synthesized.
d.
introduction, body, and conclusion.
e.
informational, persuasive, and recommendation.
50. A formal report about a complex, serious problem typically includes all of the following except
a.
a formal writing style.
b.
use of the pronoun you.
c.
a table of contents.
d.
manuscript format.
e.
many supplementary parts.
51. The answers to research questions are presented in the part of the report that covers your
a.
references.
b.
conclusions.
c.
findings.
d.
procedures.
e.
purpose statement.
52. Most reports are organized by
a.
Time and location
b.
A team
c.
The Manager
d.
An Editor
53. The most logical organization for analytical and recommendation reports is by
a.
Using an outline
b.
Criteria
c.
Presenting ideas
d.
Offering a thesis
54. If you organize first-level headings by criteria, you can do all of the following except
a.
organize second-level headings differently.
b.
avoid using Advantages and Disadvantages as headings.
c.
organize second-level headings in order of importance.
d.
factor the problem to highlight findings in second-level headings.
e.
present second-level headings in simple-to-complex order.
55. What time sequence is appropriate for meeting minutes?
a.
Functional
b.
Chronological
c.
Eastern Daylight Savings
d.
Global Time
56. Which of the following is not a conclusion?
a.
The network is not functioning correctly.
b.
Employees do not know how to use the new network properly.
c.
Both managers and employees are concerned about invasion of privacy.
d.
All employees should receive formal training in network use.
e.
Employees lack the confidence to use the new network.
57. The direct organizational plan should be used when the reader
a.
prefers to read the conclusions and recommendations last.
b.
is receptive to the conclusions or prefers the direct plan.
c.
needs detailed explanations because the topic is complex.
d.
is initially not interested in the topic.
e.
is expected to resist the recommendations at first.
58. Which of the following is not true about developing a report outline?
a.
Your problem statement and subproblems serve as your first working outline.
b.
A formal outline should provide an orderly visual representation of the report.
c.
The outline is a guide for the reader to see the development of unity and coherence in the
final report.
d.
The outline is only a working draft and will be modified as you compose the report.
e.
The outline should clearly show the points to be covered and the relationship of each point
to the rest of the report.
59. Most business reports use the (Presenting Conclusions and Recommendations)
a.
Direct Organizational Plan
b.
Indirect Organizational Plan
c.
Structure Plan
d.
Clustering Plan
60. The conclusions and recommendations part of a report should
a.
Summarize what was said in the first part of the report
b.
Summarize what was said in the body of the report
c.
Answer all research questions raised in the introduction
d.
Develop the final solution to a problem
61. Generic headings are used
a.
to identify the section topic and the major conclusion.
b.
in newspapers and magazines.
c.
as a preview or executive summary of the entire report.
d.
when the report is written according to the indirect plan.
e.
to focus attention on conclusions.
62. The body of the report consists of
a.
Findings, summary, conclusion, recommendation
b.
Statistics
c.
Policies
d.
Solution
63. In a report, the largest section is
a.
Your findings
b.
Your tone
c.
Your language
d.
Your thesis
64. Which of the following is not a component of the report body?
a.
introduction
b.
executive summary
c.
conclusions
d.
recommendations
e.
findings
65. The section in which you present information about the authorization for the report is the
a.
introduction.
b.
findings.
c.
conclusions.
d.
preliminary.
e.
appendix.
66. Some examples of numerical information given in reports are displayed in
a.
Tables and figures
b.
The textual content
c.
At the beginning of a report
d.
The conclusion
67. To make the report read clearly and smoothly use
a.
Passive voice
b.
Easy language
c.
Emphasis, subordination, preview, summary, and transitions
d.
Lots of data
68. When revising for content you should:
a.
include sufficient information
b.
describe your policy
c.
give an answer
d.
look for negative language
69. When revising your draft for style you should
a.
Vary your ideas
b.
Use words that are clear, simple, and concise
c.
Avoid active voice
d.
Use wording that repeats so the reader understands
70. The findings section of the report should
a.
be the most concise in the report.
b.
focus on the factors and subfactors of the problem.
c.
appear before the hypotheses and problem statement.
d.
accurately discuss and interpret relevant data.
e.
summarize all conclusions for the reader.
71. When referring to primary and secondary data in the findings section, you should
a.
call attention to key trends and contradictions.
b.
present less important information in tables and figures.
c.
allow readers to come to their own conclusions about implications.
d.
present facts and figures in rapid succession for busy readers.
e.
refer to research procedures when necessary.
72. The summary that precedes the conclusions and recommendations should
a.
not repeat the main points or arguments.
b.
refer readers to the transmittal document for more detail.
c.
provide a review of the problem and the main findings.
d.
reiterate the hypotheses and problem factors studied.
e.
contain the same wording as the executive summary.
73. You should use direct quotes
a.
Sparingly
b.
Often
c.
One in each paragraph
d.
Only in the conclusion
74. The body of your report should end with
a.
a list of references, if any.
b.
a statement of authorization.
c.
recommendations for further studies.
d.
a concluding statement conveying a sense of completion.
e.
an appendix with detailed data supporting the finding section.

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