Type
Quiz
Book Title
Media Essentials 4th Edition
ISBN 13
978-1319059477

978-1319059477 Test Bank Chapter 8

June 16, 2020
Page 1
1.
Who transmitted the first electronic TV picture?
A)
Vladimir Zworykin
B)
Philo Farnsworth
C)
Thomas Edison
D)
John Grierson
2.
The first TV camera tube, which converted light rays into electric signals, was called
______.
A)
static-free FM
B)
the iconosope
C)
HDTV
D)
the scanning disk jockey
3.
The FCC began assigning certain channels in specific geographic areas in the 1940s to
______.
A)
raise money for the war effort
B)
ensure that elections were covered fairly
C)
avoid signal interference among stations
D)
allow nonprofit groups to have access to TV
4.
Which of the following was not one of Sylvester “Pat” Weaver's strategies for forcing
advertisers to relinquish some of their power over television programming?
A)
The introduction of magazine shows like the Today show
B)
The development of television specials, such as TV versions of Peter Pan
C)
The development of shorter ads to be sold to individual sponsors, known as spot
ads
D)
Decreasing the length of TV programs, allowing for fewer advertisements to go to
any one sponsor
5.
Which development was a consequence of the quiz-show scandal?
A)
The patent pool was declared a monopoly and dismantled.
B)
The networks could not keep control over programming, and the sponsors became
the sole authority.
C)
Quiz-show hosts were no longer allowed to have stock in the company.
D)
It undermined Americans' belief in TV's democratic promise.
Page 2
6.
Sketch comedy is a direct descendant of _____.
A)
vaudeville
B)
kinescope
C)
situation comedy
D)
No option is correct.
7.
In a television sitcom, character(s) _____.
A)
development is emphasized over plot twists
B)
change dramatically over the course of the series
C)
are under a great deal of stress
D)
solve a problem in each episode
8.
In its early days, television drama drew on _____ for many of its technicians, sets,
actors, and directors.
A)
the movies
B)
radio
C)
New York theater
D)
the music industry
9.
Anthologies did not last long on network TV because _____.
A)
advertisers did not like them
B)
it was demanding to produce a completely new story each week
C)
they mimicked the stage tradition dealing with heavy, complicated, and
controversial topics
D)
All options are correct.
10.
Grey's Anatomy is an example of a(n) _____.
A)
anthology drama
B)
dramedy
C)
domestic comedy
D)
chapter show
11.
Cable television's oldest premium cable channel is _____.
A)
HBO
B)
A&E
C)
CNN
D)
TBS
Page 3
12.
Which of the following is not an example of a channel found in a basic cable package?
A)
Local broadcast channels
B)
Nonbroadcast access channels
C)
HBO
D)
Superstations
13.
In TV history, the “network era” refers to which time period?
A)
Late 1950s to late 1970s
B)
1950s
C)
Early 1930s to early 1940s
D)
1980s
14.
Buoyed by the spirit of deregulation, the elimination of fin-syn and other rules opened
the door for major merger deals including:
A)
Disney's purchase of ABC.
B)
AT&T's purchase of DirecTV.
C)
Comcast purchase of NBC Universal.
D)
All options are correct.
15.
The development of satellites in the 1970s allowed cable to _____.
A)
carry more channels
B)
ensure better reception
C)
expand beyond small isolated communities
D)
All options are correct.
16.
A television station not affiliated with any network is called a(n) _____.
A)
independent station
B)
syndicate
C)
PBS station
D)
YouTube channel
17.
The FCC's must-carry rules _____.
A)
required all cable operators to carry all local TV broadcasts
B)
established technical standards for cable broadcasts, regulating the signals carried
by cable systems
C)
blocked cable systems from bringing distant television stations into cities with
local stations
D)
All options are correct.
Page 4
18.
Some FCC officials and consumer groups maintain that cable systems _____.
A)
are common carriers because they control their content
B)
are electronic publishers because they are like phone companies
C)
are common carriers because they do not monitor content
D)
should have no regulations because of the First Amendment
19.
What is the most important ramification of the Telecommunications Act of 1996?
A)
It forbade telephone, radio, and TV industries from competing directly with one
another.
B)
It ended a media monopoly by splitting up regional phone companies,
long-distance carriers, and cable companies into distinct industries.
C)
It allowed regional phone companies, long-distance carriers, and cable operators to
enter and compete in one another's markets.
D)
It forced digital satellite services to carry programming from local stations.
20.
The practice of recording shows and watching them later when it is more convenient is
called _____.
A)
fin-syn
B)
viewer's choice
C)
time shifting
D)
stripping
21.
Fringe is the time _____.
A)
after the network's late-night talk shows
B)
immediately before prime time
C)
when adult-content programs are scheduled
D)
after the network's late-night talk shows and immediately before prime time
22.
The talk show Ellen is an example of _____.
A)
off-network syndication
B)
first-run syndication
C)
an evergreen
D)
hybrid syndication
23.
Below-the-line costs for a TV program include the _____.
A)
art directors
B)
cameras and crews
C)
electricians
D)
All options are correct.
Page 5
24.
Which term best describes the financial arrangement that most TV producers and movie
studios enter into to make prime-time TV shows?
A)
Joint funded
B)
Above-the-line costs
C)
Deficit financing
D)
Economy of scale
25.
An Idaho teenager named Philo T. Farnsworth is credited with transmitting the first TV
picture electronically.
A)
True
B)
False
26.
The quiz-show scandals of the late 1950s resulted from quiz shows' frequently accepting
incorrect answers from contestants and then covering up the mistakes.
A)
True
B)
False
27.
Many of the comedy program conventions in television actually came from radio.
A)
True
B)
False
28.
Only a few TV series from the 1950s have survived, and that is because they were
originally shot on film.
A)
True
B)
False
29.
Grey's Anatomy and CSI are both examples of chapter shows.
A)
True
B)
False
30.
Public television was created by Congress to serve viewers whose interests were ignored
by commercial TV.
A)
True
B)
False
31.
CNN dominates international TV news coverage.
A)
True
B)
False
Page 6
32.
Concerned that cable television would undermine broadcast television, the Federal
Communications Commission (FCC) enacted rules limiting cable's early growth.
A)
True
B)
False
33.
Must-carry rules require all cable operators to assign channels to and carry all local TV
broadcasts on their systems.
A)
True
B)
False
34.
In the landmark Midwest Video case, the U.S. Supreme Court defined the cable industry
as a form of electronic publishing and upheld their right to dictate their own content.
A)
True
B)
False
35.
Starting in 1999, the digital video recorder (DVR) rapidly replaced VCRs, and viewers
recorded shows on DVDs instead of VHS tapes.
A)
True
B)
False
36.
DBS (direct broadcast satellite) television services in the United States were first
developed in the 1940s, but did not become widely used until the 1970s.
A)
True
B)
False
37.
All syndicated programming consists of off-network reruns.
A)
True
B)
False
38.
In TV syndication, a barter deal involves exchanging a show for a percent of ad
revenue.
A)
True
B)
False
39.
Most television shows live or die by advertising.
A)
True
B)
False
Page 7
40.
A share gauges the percent of homes tuned to a program compared with those actually
using their sets at the time of the sample.
A)
True
B)
False
41.
An hour-long television newsmagazine show such as Dateline NBC and 60 Minutes
costs about twice as much to produce as a typical hour-long drama.
A)
True
B)
False
42.
Networks have the right to sell the bulk of advertising time (and run promotions of its
own programs) during the showswhich helps them recoup their investments.
A)
True
B)
False
43.
The major television networksCBS, ABC, FOX, and NBCown most of their
affiliated stations.
A)
True
B)
False
44.
Despite the number of cable offerings, the four major traditional TV networks (ABC,
CBS, NBC, and FOX) have remained an attractive business investment.
A)
True
B)
False
45.
The development of cable, VCRs and DVD players, DVRs, the Internet, and
smartphone services has fragmented television's audience.
A)
True
B)
False
46.
Although independently owned, _____ are local TV stations that contract with a
network to carry its programs.
47.
A 1950s technique for preserving television broadcasts by using a film camera to record
a live TV show off a studio monitor was called _____.
Page 8
48.
_____, a popular form of early TV programming that brought live dramatic theater to
television, borrowed heavily from live theater.
49.
Ted Turner revolutionized cable through his Atlanta-based station _____.
50.
WGN in Chicago and WPIX in New York are examples of _____.
51.
The FCC has mandated _____ in the nation's top one hundred TV markets, requiring
cable systems to provide free nonbroadcast channels that local citizens, educators, and
governments could use.
52.
In television, _____ is any non-network program specifically produced for sale only into
syndication markets.
53.
Since 1950, _____ has been the major organization tracking and rating prime-time
viewing.
54.
When using _____, a production company leases the show to a network for a license fee
that is less than the cost of production, assuming it will recoup this loss later in lucrative
rerun syndication
55.
The development of cable, VCRs and DVD players, _____, the Internet, and
smartphone services has fragmented television's audience by appealing to viewers'
individual and special needs.
56.
How did the sponsorship of network programs change during the 1950s?
57.
What is the difference between sketch comedy and situation comedy in television?
58.
What services does PBS provide, and how has it fared in comparison with the major
networks?
59.
What were the major threats to the television networks in the 1970s and 1980s?
Page 9
60.
How does the television industry make money?
61.
What are the differences between off-network and first-run syndication?
62.
How has new technology fragmented the television audience, and what are the
consequences for our society?
Answer Key
1.
B
2.
B
Page 11
56.
57.
58.
59.
60.
61.
62.
4. the electronic era really took off with the arrival of what? a) radio b) television c) the internet d) the telegraph 6. what is one main meaning of the term media convergence? a) the technological merging of content across different media channels, such as songs being available on cell phones b) the appropriation of american products by foreign advertisers c) the diversification of various media holdings—such as cable connections, phone services, television transmissions, and internet access—into separate companies d) all options are correct. page 1 8. the linear communication model can be criticized on the grounds that a) it assumes that culture is hierarchical. b) it asserts that audiences create their own meanings from messages sent. c) it does not usually move messages smoothly from a sender at point a to a receiver at point z. d) it conforms too closely to the eps model. 13. a manuscript culture existed between 1000 bce and the mid-fifteenth century and manuscripts were commissioned by members of the ruling classes. a) true b) false 14. the printing press fostered the rise of tribal storytellers. a) true b) false 15. gutenberg played an active role in the transition from oral to written culture. a) true b) false 16. with the coming of the printing press, the printed newspaper became the first mass-marketed product in history. a) true b) false 17. the computer was the first electronic innovation. a) true b) false 18. media convergence is considered a characteristic of the digital turn. a) true b) false 19. according to the textbook, media convergence has two very different meanings. a) true b) false 20. researchers do not all agree on whether watching violent tv shows makes viewers more likely to commit violent acts than not watching such tv shows. a) true b) false page 3 21. the senders of messages often have very little control over how their messages will be decoded. a) true b) false 22. according to the textbook, as cultural forms, the media help us make sense of daily life and articulate our values. a) true b) false 23. the cultural model recognizes that individuals assign diverse meanings to messages depending on personal characteristics, such as gender, age, educational level, ethnicity, occupation, and religious beliefs. a) true b) false 25. high culture is the same as popular culture. a) true b) false 27. the progressive era is another name for the postmodern period. a) true b) false 28. postmodern cultural values include working efficiently and believing in a rational order. a) true b) false page 4 29. content analysis is a tool of the social scientific approach. a) true b) false 30. in the textbook's comparison of two types of research about cancer news coverage, the social scientific approach focused on interpretation of the meanings of the media stories. a) true b) false 31. the critical process consists of describing, analyzing, interpreting, evaluating, and engaging with mass media. a) true b) false 32. those who consult research to acquire media literacy should concentrate on either cultural studies or social scientific studies. a) true b) false 3. many books from the middle ages were called illuminated manuscripts because they were _____. a) elaborately decorated with colorful illustrations b) printed using reflective ink c) burned in castle fireplaces to honor god d) read aloud in the town square by scholars who explained, or illuminated, the text 5. the right to use the contents of a book in another form, such as a mass market paperback or movie script, is called _____. a) royalties b) residuals c) subsidiary rights d) an advance 6. the division of the book industry that makes the most money is _____. a) trade books b) textbooks c) religious books d) mass market paperbacks page 1 8. the best-selling book of all time is _____. a) various versions of the bible b) better homes and gardens cookbook c) baby and child care by dr. benjamin spock d) peyton place by grace metalious 9. in 2015, the greatest estimated u.s. book revenue was generated by which market? a) pre-k–12 education b) trade books c) religious books d) professional books 10. numerous books have become best-sellers after they were selected for ____. a) inside edition b) oprah's book club c) c-span's booknotes program d) 20/20 11. many older books are deteriorating because _____. a) there is too much humidity in the library buildings b) the ink used in printing the books is eating through the paper c) the glue holding the books together is drying out d) the books were printed on acid-based paper 12. for hundreds of years, books were the only mass medium. a) true b) false 15. pulp fiction was another name for the popular paperbacks and dime novels of the late 1800s. a) true b) false 16. book publishing is dominated by a handful of giant corporations. a) true b) false 17. with the rise of electronic and digital publishing, book formats have expanded beyond print. a) true b) false 18. the publishing industry produces titles in a wide variety of categories. a) true b) false 19. trade books refers to the category of books sold to the general reader. a) true b) false 20. professional books are sold mostly through mail order, the internet, or sales representatives knowledgeable about the various subject areas. a) true b) false 23. sales of religious books have dropped substantially over the past twenty years. a) true b) false 24. university presses often publish scholarly works for small groups of readers interested in specialized areas. a) true b) false 25. amazon introduced an e-book reader—the kindle—in 2007. a) true b) false 26. brick-and-mortar stores include traditional bookstores, department stores, drugstores, used-book stores, and toy stores. a) true b) false 27. when a book becomes a movie or a television program, book sales soar. a) true b) false 28. in the publishing industry, advance money is an up-front payment to an author that's subtracted from royalties later earned from book sales. a) true b) false 29. distribution costs include maintaining the inventory of books to be sold and fulfilling orders (shipping books to commercial outlets or college bookstores). a) true b) false page 4 3. penny press newspapers _____. a) favored human-interest stories b) relied on subsidies from political parties c) catered to upper-class readers d) were sold exclusively by subscription 10. a newshole is _____. a) the portion of the newspaper dedicated to commercials b) nonnews stories that blur the line between entertainment and hard news c) the space left for news in the paper after the ads have been placed d) stories not covered by a particular newspaper because of a reporter shortage 11. the majority of large daily papers today devote as much as one-half to two-thirds of their pages to _____. a) print subscriptions b) online subscriptions c) advertisements d) subsidiary products 13. in objective journalism, reporters ideally strive to maintain a neutral attitude toward the issue or event they cover. a) true b) false 16. many editors discourage e-mail interviews because it gives the interviewees too much control over shaping their answers. a) true b) false 17. for mainstream print and tv reporters and editors, online news has not added new dimensions to journalism. a) true b) false 18. journalists in the digital age have not faced additional demands as the result of convergence. a) true b) false 19. for most journalists, the bottom line is to “get the story.” a) true b) false page 3 20. most mainstream news organizations do not have ethical expectations for journalists that extend beyond the hours spent on the job. a) true b) false 22. the “echo chamber” refers to the idea that some media consciously cater to a portion of society, and that people will seek out only those sources with which they agree and avoid any news that might challenge their worldview. a) true b) false 23. conventional journalists will fight ferociously for the principles that underpin journalism's basic tenets. a) true b) false 1. the saturday evening post was the first major magazine to appeal directly to ______. a) farmers b) women c) immigrants d) retirees 2. in 1828, sarah josepha hale started the first magazine directed exclusively to a female audience, called ______. a) godey's ladies book b) youth's companion c) ladies' magazine d) ladies' home journal 3. what factor had an effect on the dramatic growth in magazine circulation in the nineteenth century? a) increased literacy b) improvements in mail delivery c) faster printing technologies d) all options are correct. 5. which magazine was the foremost outlet for photojournalism in the mid-twentieth century? a) the saturday evening post b) the north american review c) life d) harper's 7. tv guide became so popular because _____. a) it was initially free b) its first issue featured elvis c) it offered lurid commentary about tv stars d) newspapers had not yet started publishing tv listings 8. which popular magazine emerged in 1974 to capitalize on the celebrity-crazed culture that accompanied the rise of television? a) life b) tv guide c) people d) the saturday evening post 9. hugh hefner's playboy magazine became an instant success in 1953, thanks in part to _____. a) an expensive tv ad campaign b) sending free copies to one million male college students c) articles that criticized divorced and working women d) reaching a niche audience not served by tv 10. in targeting audiences by age, the most dramatic recent success has come from magazines aimed at ____. a) children b) teenagers c) young adults d) readers over fifty 12. the new yorker is an example of _____. a) a minority magazine b) an elite magazine c) a leisure magazine d) a webzine page 2 13. which is an example of a trade publication? a) the nation b) national review c) insight d) variety 16. the average magazine contains about _____. a) 10 percent ads b) 25 percent ads c) 45 percent ads d) 75 percent ads 17. a national magazine with split-run editions ____. a) includes a few pages of ads purchased by local or regional companies b) contains different stories for different geographic regions c) relies solely on newsstand sales d) sends special editorial content to readers with high incomes 19. magazines became a national mass medium in the united states before newspapers did. a) true b) false 20. the word magazine comes from the french term magasin, meaning “storehouse.” a) true b) false 22. since their beginnings in the 1740s, american magazines have primarily been a medium of entertainment and diversion. a) true b) false 24. general-interest magazines began to appear in the united states in the nineteenth century. a) true b) false 27. in 1906, president theodore roosevelt dubbed investigative reporters muckrakers. a) true b) false 29. the saturday evening post continued the muckraking tradition—especially by criticizing business corruption—into the 1920s. a) true b) false 30. by the mid-1980s reader's digest was one of the most popular magazines in the world. a) true b) false 31. in the 1970s, as families began spending more time gathered around their tvs instead of reading magazines, advertisers began spending more money on tv spots, which were less expensive than magazine ads and reached a larger audience. a) true b) false 32. tv guide's physical format has largely remained the same since it was founded in 1953. a) true b) false 33. in 1974, people became one of the first successful mass market magazines to be introduced in decades. a) true b) false 34. the circulation of rolling stone has dropped in recent years because readers objected to its alternative standing. a) true b) false page 5 35. alternative magazines publish information “outside the mainstream.” a) true b) false 38. at first observers viewed the internet as the death knell for print magazines, but now the industry embraces it. a) true b) false 39. some advertisers and companies have canceled ads when a magazine printed articles that were unflattering toward or critical of the firm or its industry. a) true b) false 42. the typical consumer magazine distributes far more copies through single-copy sales by retailers than through subscriptions. a) true b) false page 6 43. evergreen magazine subscriptions are those that are automatically renew on the subscriber's credit card. a) true b) false 44. large companies or chains have come to dominate the magazine business. a) true b) false 1. a major difference between sound recordings made by emile berliner and those made by thomas edison was that _____. a) berliner's disks were made of wax b) edison's disks could be mass produced c) berliner's disks were flat d) edison's disks were coated with lamp black 2. under the compromise reached by cbs and rca in 1953, singles were released on the _____ format. a) 33-1/3 rpm b) 45 rpm c) 78 rpm d) cd 3. the advent of _____ paved the way for digital recording. a) wax cylinders b) lamp black c) magnetic audiotape d) flat disks 4. for a time, white cover music versions of black rock-and-roll artists' songs were more popular and profitably, but a turning point occurred with which event? a) little richard had a hit, “tutti frutti,” in 1956. b) ray charles made a no. 1 hit covering a country song in 1962. c) the marvellettes scored a no. 1 hit with “please mr. postman” in 1961. d) lauren hill covered frankie valli's old tune “can't take my eyes off of you” in 1998 5. in an attempt to get people to accept rock's blurring of racial and other lines, cleveland deejay alan freed played _____ from the race charts and black versions of early rock on his program. a) original rhythm-and-blues music b) rhythm-and-blues songs as they were covered by white musicians c) blues music from southern artists d) rockabilly music that combined country, southern gospel, and mississippi delta blues page 1 7. one particularly difficult battle rock faced was the perception among mainstream adults that the music caused _____. a) juvenile delinquency b) monopolistic control of the music industry c) the cold war d) obscene and immoral behavior of recording artists 9. music industry revenue since 2000 is ____. a) increasing b) about the same c) dropping d) concentrated in independent labels 10. early inventors' work helped make sound recording a mass medium and a product that enterprising businesspeople could sell. a) true b) false 11. thomas edison made his first sound recordings on a cylinder wrapped in foil. a) true b) false 12. unlike edison's phonograph, emile berliner's gramophone played flat disks. a) true b) false page 2 13. the recording industry switched from shellac to vinyl records in the early 1940s. a) true b) false 14. one advantage of polyvinyl records over shellac records is that they were less likely to break. a) true b) false 16. some people thought audiotape's portability, superior sound, and recording capabilities would mean the demise of records. a) true b) false 17. digital recording translates sound waves into binary on-off pulses and stores that information in sequences of ones and zeros as numerical code. a) true b) false 19. in the mid-1920s, hundreds of radio stations went off the air because they could not afford to pay for the rights to broadcast recorded music. a) true b) false 20. the popularity of the jukebox caused record sales to drop sharply in the 1930s. a) true b) false page 3 21. competition from tv in the 1950s helped the radio and recording industries become allies. a) true b) false 22. motown became the foundation of rock and roll and was influenced by african american spirituals, ballads, and work songs from the rural south. a) true b) false 23. by 1955, r&b hits regularly crossed over to the pop charts, but for a time the white cover music versions were more popular and profitable. a) true b) false 24. cleveland deejay alan freed played original r&b recordings from the race charts and black versions of early rock on his program. a) true b) false 25. in the late 1950s, singers little richard and jerry lee lewis became convinced that they were playing “devil's music.” a) true b) false 27. motown records attracted a young, white audience primarily by emphasizing romance and a danceable beat over rebellion and political upheaval. a) true b) false 28. folk is considered a democratic and participatory form of music. a) true b) false page 4 29. punk rock arose in the late 1970s partly to defy the orthodoxy and commercialism of the record business. a) true b) false 30. jimi hendrix was a star of rock's psychedelic era. a) true b) false 31. grunge music became a significant form of rock and roll in 1992 as a result of a breakthrough album by nirvana. a) true b) false 32. because they are smaller, independent record companies are reluctant to invest in music that appears to be less commercial. a) true b) false 33. independent labels produce only about two percent of all recordings. a) true b) false 34. the advent of advertising supported music streaming services has weakened interest in online piracy—unauthorized online file-sharing and illegal file-swapping. a) true b) false 36. artists receive a performance royalty when one of their songs is played on the radio. a) true b) false page 5 37. songwriters and publishers receive a mechanical royalty each time a recording of their song is sold. a) true b) false 1. the telegraph had significant limitations as a means of communicating between ships because _____, making it useless for anyone seeking to communicate with ships at sea. a) its signal was too weak to travel across bodies of water b) the telegraph signal was distorted by the electromagnetic spectrum c) telegraph equipment was too cumbersome to be used aboard ship d) it depended on wires 3. the person credited with making the first voice broadcast is ______. a) heinrich hertz b) guglielmo marconi c) lee de forest d) reginald fessenden 5. which event led to the radio act of 1912 and required all radio stations on land or at sea to be licensed and assigned special call letters? a) fessenden's 1906 christmas eve transmission b) the sinking of the titanic c) david sarnoff's wedding d) lee de forest's eiffel tower broadcast 6. what did the government do with radio when the united states entered world war i in 1917? a) created a private monopoly b) closed down all amateur radio operations c) sold patents to great britain d) created national public radio page 1 7. ge founded the radio corporation of america (rca) to purchase and pool patents from the navy, at&t, ge, the former ______, and other companies to ensure u.s. control over the manufacture of radio transmitters and receivers. a) american marconi b) at&t c) westinghouse d) wnbc 8. who set up a crude radio station above his pittsburgh garage in 1916? a) edwin h. armstrong b) david sarnoff c) ethan zuckerman d) frank conrad 10. as a new network, cbs was able to compete with nbc by ____. a) charging affiliates less for its programs b) advertising its programs on billboards c) paying affiliates to carry its programs d) being the first network to broadcast in high fidelity 11. the act that first emphasized that licensees did not own their channels but were granted licenses provided that they operated in the “public interest, convenience, or necessity” was the _____. a) federal communications act of 1934 b) radio act of 1912 c) radio act of 1927 d) 1932 revocation of rca's monopoly status page 2 12. what time period is considered the “golden age” of radio? a) late 1950s b) early 1900s c) 1920s through 1940s d) 1890s through 1910s 13. the transistor made radio receivers ____. a) portable b) expensive c) larger d) stereophonic 14. the public found it easy to believe orson welles's broadcast of war of the worlds because _____. a) it sounded like an authentic news report b) the broadcast was never identified as fiction or a dramatization c) a sizable meteor really did hit new jersey that day d) all options are correct. 15. tv snatched radio's ____. a) audiences b) program genres c) place in the living room d) all options are correct. 16. compared to am radio, fm radio _____. a) includes less static and has greater clarity b) is cheaper to operate c) is better for talk programs d) no option is correct. 17. radio formats usually target special audiences according to _____. a) age and income b) gender c) race or ethnicity d) all options are correct. page 3 18. network radio helped give the united states “a national identity.” a) true b) false 20. guglielmo marconi received a patent on wireless telegraphy, a form of voiceless point-to-point communication. a) true b) false 21. history often cites marconi as the “father of radio,” but russian scientist alexander popov accomplished similar feats in st. petersburg at the same time. a) true b) false 22. nikola tesla was the founder of the first radio network. a) true b) false 24. american marconi (a subsidiary of british marconi) was the biggest of the companies focused on ship-to-shore communication. a) true b) false 25. the wireless ship act of 1910 resulted from the sinking of the titanic. a) true b) false page 4 26. william paley built the cbs network by charging large fees to its affiliates. a) true b) false 27. the radio act of 1927 created the radio corporation of america. a) true b) false 28. in the 1940s, nbc sold its blue network, which then became cbs. a) true b) false 29. radio soap operas got their name because they were often sponsored by makers of soap products. a) true b) false 30. the period of the 1920s through the 1940s was marked by a proliferation of informative and entertaining radio programs. a) true b) false 31. the invention of the transistor in the late 1940s made radio more accessible and portable than ever. a) true b) false 32. the radio industry transformed its business model in the 1950s because of television. a) true b) false 33. the term top 40 is derived from the number of records stored in a jukebox, and top 40 format refers to the forty most popular hits in a given week as measured by record sales. a) true b) false page 5 34. am radio is superior to fm radio for broadcasting music. a) true b) false 36. jazz music formats in radio today reach more total listeners than any other format. a) true b) false 37. the aim of networks such as cbs and nbc was to serve the public interest. a) true b) false 38. congress created national public radio to help win the cold war. a) true b) false 39. one type of internet radio station involves an existing am, fm, satellite, or hd station “streaming” a simulcast version of its on-air signal over the web. a) true b) false 41. the practice of payola affected 1950s radio, but does not occur today. a) true b) false page 6 42. the fcc cannot provide oversight for the practice of payola on streaming radio services. a) true b) false 43. combined, the top three commercial radio groups—iheartmedia, cumulus, and townsquare media—own over sixteen hundred stations. a) true b) false 44. the telecommunications act of 1996 has resulted in more competition and less consolidation in u.s. radio. a) true b) false 46. most radio markets in the united states are dominated by a few owners. a) true b) false 1. who opened the first public movie theater in france in 1896? a) auguste lumière b) adolph zukor c) georges méliès d) louis lumière 2. american filmmaker edwin s. porter (maker of the life of an american fireman) a) shot narrative scenes out of order. b) made what is considered america's first narrative film. c) used the first recorded close-up in u.s. narrative film history. d) all options are correct. 5. in an early attempt to dominate the film industry, inventor thomas edison formed a) the motion picture monopoly of america. b) the edison oligopoly company. c) paramount studios. d) the motion picture patents company. 6. adolph zukor formed the famous players company in 1912 to a) give young actors a start in movies. b) exert control over movie production. c) serve as an agent for established actors. d) make exceptional movies with the best directors available. page 1 7. after edison, adolph zukor of paramount tried to monopolize the film industry by controlling a) production. b) distribution. c) exhibition. d) all options are correct. 9. who launched the company united artists? a) mary pickford b) douglas fairbanks c) charlie chaplin d) all options are correct. 10. under the studio system a) actors were independent contractors who could work for any studio. b) movies were made on an assembly line basis. c) the studios had no control over the private lives of their creative talent. d) producers were hired to direct the pictures. 11. to gain access to popular films, early theater owners and exhibitors had to agree to rent new or marginal films featuring no stars. this distribution strategy was called a) international distribution. b) block booking. c) option time. d) zukor's law. 13. _____ were built in the early 1900s to draw members of the middle and upper-middle classes to the movies. a) small neighborhood theaters b) downtown first-run theaters c) multiplexes in shopping malls d) movie palaces 14. which film was the first successful talking motion picture? a) the great train robbery b) the singing fool c) birth of a nation d) the jazz singer 15. _____ demonstrated the government's attempts at breaking up monopolies within the film industry. a) fin-syn b) the paramount decision c) the telecommunications act of 1996 d) huac 16. the drop in movie attendance that occurred after world war ii can be attributed to a) competition from radio. b) the population shift to the suburbs. c) the paramount decision. d) all options are correct. 17. in an effort to compete with television in the 1950s, the movie studios began making a) big-budget family films. b) documentaries. c) x-rated adult movies. d) films that dealt with social problems. 20. which of these is not a reason u.s. film viewing decreased during the 1950s a) television cornered the family market b) innovations like technicolor were not enough to lure people downtown c) americans chose to spend their money on material goods rather than movie tickets d) the introduction of cable television 21. _____ generate more revenue than domestic box-office income for major studios. a) dvd/video sales and rentals b) premium cable and pay-per-view sales c) distribution in international markets d) product placements 22. thomas edison was the first person who theorized about the possibility of motion pictures. a) true b) false 23. the first kinetoscope motion pictures were watched by only one person at a time. a) true b) false 24. the first public showing of edison's kinetoscope projector system was in a paris café in december 1895 where hundreds of viewers saw images on a large screen. a) true b) false 25. georges méliès made the first western, the great train robbery. a) true b) false page 4 28. an oligopoly exists when a few companies control an industry. a) true b) false 30. marilyn monroe became known as “america's sweetheart” after her work with the famous players film company shortly after 1912. a) true b) false 31. american studios were able to gain control of the world film industry during world war i. a) true b) false 34. birth of a nation (1915) was the first feature-length film produced in the united states. a) true b) false 35. the singing fool was the first real breakthrough for talkies. a) true b) false 36. the first sound movie, the jazz singer, was basically a silent film with a few spoken words. a) true b) false 38. examples of genres include comedy, drama, romance, and action/adventure. a) true b) false 39. film noir movies are notable for their bright lighting, lush sets, and upbeat story lines. a) true b) false 41. hollywood's primary “authors” are scriptwriters. a) true b) false page 6 43. all commercial movies made in the world are now produced and shot in hollywood. a) true b) false 44. american audiences refuse to watch foreign films. a) true b) false 45. today, the world's largest film industry is in india, out of the so-called bombaywood. a) true b) false 47. documentaries generally avoid controversial or unpopular subject matter. a) true b) false 48. the government's 1948 order forcing the major studios to sell their theaters effectively ended their control of the movie industry. a) true b) false 49. the paramount decision ended the dominance of the major studios over the commercial film industry. a) true b) false page 7 50. the motion picture production code was established in the 1960s to rate movies for age-appropriate content. a) true b) false 51. the major film studios were able to dominate movie exhibition in the united states by acquiring all the country's drive-in theaters. a) true b) false 52. domestic box-office income is still the largest single source of revenue for a typical feature film. a) true b) false 53. despite the popularity of dvds, theme parks, and soundtrack cds, the hollywood studio system continues to make money. a) true b) false 54. the film industry makes more money today from first-run releases in movie theaters than from home dvd/video releases. a) true b) false 55. international box-office gross revenues are almost double the u.s. and canadian box-office receipts. a) true b) false 56. film studios have generally resisted making product placement deals for creative reasons. a) true b) false 57. six studios dominate the u.s. film business. a) true b) false page 8 59. a “consensus narrative” is a type of movie that seeks a small, select niche audience. a) true b) false 1. who transmitted the first electronic tv picture? a) vladimir zworykin b) philo farnsworth c) thomas edison d) john grierson 2. the first tv camera tube, which converted light rays into electric signals, was called ______. a) static-free fm b) the iconosope c) hdtv d) the scanning disk jockey 3. the fcc began assigning certain channels in specific geographic areas in the 1940s to ______. a) raise money for the war effort b) ensure that elections were covered fairly c) avoid signal interference among stations d) allow nonprofit groups to have access to tv 6. sketch comedy is a direct descendant of _____. a) vaudeville b) kinescope c) situation comedy d) no option is correct. 7. in a television sitcom, character(s) _____. a) development is emphasized over plot twists b) change dramatically over the course of the series c) are under a great deal of stress d) solve a problem in each episode 8. in its early days, television drama drew on _____ for many of its technicians, sets, actors, and directors. a) the movies b) radio c) new york theater d) the music industry 10. grey's anatomy is an example of a(n) _____. a) anthology drama b) dramedy c) domestic comedy d) chapter show 11. cable television's oldest premium cable channel is _____. a) hbo b) a&e c) cnn d) tbs page 2 13. in tv history, the “network era” refers to which time period? a) late 1950s to late 1970s b) 1950s c) early 1930s to early 1940s d) 1980s 14. buoyed by the spirit of deregulation, the elimination of fin-syn and other rules opened the door for major merger deals including: a) disney's purchase of abc. b) at&t's purchase of directv. c) comcast purchase of nbc universal. d) all options are correct. 16. a television station not affiliated with any network is called a(n) _____. a) independent station b) syndicate c) pbs station d) youtube channel 17. the fcc's must-carry rules _____. a) required all cable operators to carry all local tv broadcasts b) established technical standards for cable broadcasts, regulating the signals carried by cable systems c) blocked cable systems from bringing distant television stations into cities with local stations d) all options are correct. page 3 18. some fcc officials and consumer groups maintain that cable systems _____. a) are common carriers because they control their content b) are electronic publishers because they are like phone companies c) are common carriers because they do not monitor content d) should have no regulations because of the first amendment 19. what is the most important ramification of the telecommunications act of 1996? a) it forbade telephone, radio, and tv industries from competing directly with one another. b) it ended a media monopoly by splitting up regional phone companies, long-distance carriers, and cable companies into distinct industries. c) it allowed regional phone companies, long-distance carriers, and cable operators to enter and compete in one another's markets. d) it forced digital satellite services to carry programming from local stations. 20. the practice of recording shows and watching them later when it is more convenient is called _____. a) fin-syn b) viewer's choice c) time shifting d) stripping 21. fringe is the time _____. a) after the network's late-night talk shows b) immediately before prime time c) when adult-content programs are scheduled d) after the network's late-night talk shows and immediately before prime time 22. the talk show ellen is an example of _____. a) off-network syndication b) first-run syndication c) an evergreen d) hybrid syndication 24. which term best describes the financial arrangement that most tv producers and movie studios enter into to make prime-time tv shows? a) joint funded b) above-the-line costs c) deficit financing d) economy of scale 26. the quiz-show scandals of the late 1950s resulted from quiz shows' frequently accepting incorrect answers from contestants and then covering up the mistakes. a) true b) false 27. many of the comedy program conventions in television actually came from radio. a) true b) false 28. only a few tv series from the 1950s have survived, and that is because they were originally shot on film. a) true b) false 29. grey's anatomy and csi are both examples of chapter shows. a) true b) false 30. public television was created by congress to serve viewers whose interests were ignored by commercial tv. a) true b) false 31. cnn dominates international tv news coverage. a) true b) false page 5 32. concerned that cable television would undermine broadcast television, the federal communications commission (fcc) enacted rules limiting cable's early growth. a) true b) false 34. in the landmark midwest video case, the u.s. supreme court defined the cable industry as a form of electronic publishing and upheld their right to dictate their own content. a) true b) false 35. starting in 1999, the digital video recorder (dvr) rapidly replaced vcrs, and viewers recorded shows on dvds instead of vhs tapes. a) true b) false 37. all syndicated programming consists of off-network reruns. a) true b) false 38. in tv syndication, a barter deal involves exchanging a show for a percent of ad revenue. a) true b) false 39. most television shows live or die by advertising. a) true b) false page 6 40. a share gauges the percent of homes tuned to a program compared with those actually using their sets at the time of the sample. a) true b) false 42. networks have the right to sell the bulk of advertising time (and run promotions of its own programs) during the shows—which helps them recoup their investments. a) true b) false 43. the major television networks—cbs, abc, fox, and nbc—own most of their affiliated stations. a) true b) false 44. despite the number of cable offerings, the four major traditional tv networks (abc, cbs, nbc, and fox) have remained an attractive business investment. a) true b) false

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