Type
Essay
Pages
6 pages
Word Count
2307 words
School
N/A
Course Code
N/A

Eat, Pray, Queef

October 8, 2014
Eat, Pray, Queef
The TV show South Park is an American animated television show written and created by
Trey Parker and Matt Stone. It has aired on Comedy Central since 1997 (www.southpark.com);
the show follows the surreal adventures of four young boy characters; Stan Marsh, Kyle
Broflovski, Eric Cartman and Kenny McCormick, who live in the small town of South Park,
Colorado. South Park satirizes many aspects of American culture and current events, and
challenges deep-set convictions and taboos, usually using parody and black humor. South Park
revolves around the four boys and their bizarre adventures in their Colorado town. The show uses
satire, which is, “A literary work in which human vice or folly is attacked through irony, derision,
or wit” (www.thefreedictionary.com), to get its points across. In Season 13, Episode, “Eat, Pray,
Queef,” the show appears to be very feminist. Feminist being defined as, “The doctrine
advocating social, political, and all other rights of women equal to those of men”
(www.dictionary.com). In this episode the show is not only feminist but also anti-feminist in
many ways, meaning that it sort of argues both sides here and there. It describes how in today’s
society it is almost acceptable and funny for men to fart. While on the other hand it is cruel, not
right, and just plain disgusting to hear a woman queef. It goes along with the President of the
Canadian Network asking the audience that if they think farts are funny then why not queefs?
Men do not think women should not be allowed to queef but on the other hand men still believe
they should be allowed to fart whenever. But when the men realize that the stuff they are
prohibiting their wives to do is ruining their relationships, they begin to accept the fact that
women queef. Like many other South Park episodes, satire is used to express a heavier point of
view than the obvious. In this particular instance, women are fighting for their right to queef, but
in actuality they are fighting for something much deeper than that, they’re fighting for their rights
as equals.
“Eat, Pray, Queef,” starts off in the halls of the South Park Elementary School where the
halls are empty and with the bell ringing for the end of class. All the boys walk out of their class
in excitement for the popular TV show Terrance and Phillip to come on that night. It is part two

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